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22 Apr 2014

obr1509_1

New movement detectors (PIR) represent a Professional solution with up to 30 m range and wide possibilities of assembly.

On the market, there are many movement detectors based on a PIR sensor. For a simple usage, like for example lighting of a garage entry. Probably, it´s not necessary to use a top quality sensor with exactly defined specification and with wide possibilities of adjustment if you´d like to use it for example for a simple lighting of a garage entry. But a for a frequented corridors, security devices, lighting switching, … it´s surely beneficial if having a detector which we can rely on. Detectors from company Finder belong to such category. Finder offers five basic series:

18.01/18.11 – detector with a wide detection angle and a universal assembly with a possibility of an easy selection of a spce to survey. Typ 18.01 is suitable for indoor applications, 18.11 also outdoor.

18.21/18.31 – detector for ceilings with a surface or recessed assembly

18.41 – detector for hotel or office corridors, up to 30x4m range (depending on a height of a ceiling)

18.51 – highly sensitive ceiling type with a square detection pattern (up to 8x8m), suitable for schools, offices and also low activity zones. High sensitivity enables operation in 2 modes – “presence” and “movement”. In this case even a minimum movement, like for example a work on a PC is sufficient to activate the detector. Such a sensitivity can help to prevent for example an unwanted locking of building and activation of alarm, when you already think, that there´s nobody inside (but in fact, somebody is still there :-)).

18.61 – specific product for a wall assembly, 180° angle of survey, detects a half-circle with up to 18m diameter.

All types have elements for adjustment – ambient light sensitivity and a switch-on time of a contact (from a last detection). New types – 18.41, 18.51 and 18.61 also have the third adjusting element – sensitivity of the sensor itself. Thanks to them, it´s possible to adjust a detector to meet requirements of a given application. Logic of switching is an “addition”, i.e. if in time of a switched-on contact occurs another detection, the sensor will prolong the switch-on time for the selected time, i.e. no switch-off of the output contact (neither a short one) will occur. All types are designed for mains applications (96-253VAC) and they have a relay output (10A contact). Contact at types 18.41, 18.51 and 18.61 is also able to switch 400VAC.

Types 18.41, 18.51 and 18.61 are supplied with a rich set of accessories enabling a comfortable and aesthetic mounting as suspended ceiling, recess mounting (for example into a wall) and surface mounting.
Detailed information will provide you the Finder 18.01-31 and Finder 18.41-61 datasheets as well as the Finder 18 flyer (DE) and the attached video.

Detectors Finder will detect you even if you don’t move - [Link]

20 Jun 2013

0909_01

Boris Landoni writes:

It’s small but packed with features. The GSM alarm we present today, sports a PIR motion sensor, can be battery operated and it’s capable to communicate via GSM. It can transmit alarm conditions and receive commands from remote. It’s also capable to indicate problems such as is insufficient voltage supply or tampering.

It’s not so conventional for antitheft system: to integrate a movement sensor, a PIR motion sensor and a temperature probe in a single appliance: all this accompanied by an SMS sending GSM / GPRS module. This circuit was born as a very versatile, ready to use, built-in alarm system: no installation is required, you can just drop it and it’s ready to work. It’s not by chance that is designed to be battery operated: it also features a battery state control to check the power.

GSM Multifuction Alarm with SIM900 - [Link]

9 Jan 2012

electrobob.com writes:

I have recently stumbled upon some LED strip at my local electronics shop and decided to give them a try. I bought some which I used to replace the spot lights in the kitchen. It is cold white, which is surprisingly good, especially for night time illumination (think moonlight like hue). It works at 12V and consumes about 0.25A per meter.

After installing the strip, some automation proved to be necessary, and so the following circuits were built. The goal in mind was to keep things as simple as possible and use only parts I had at hand, which is why the solution might not be the best.

The hallway spotlights got new white LEDs as well and a light sensor. Tiny PIR sensors will turn on the lights in the kitchen and bathroom when someone comes in range. The sensors are rather popular modules using a BISS0001 IC; they provide a 3.3V level for an adjustable time when motion is detected.

Overall the results are great. The hallway is lit at night, the there is a small automatic light for the bathroom and the automatic kitchen light is bright enough even for day time illumination of the sink and counter. The slow turn off provides both a visually pleasing effect and a warning in case someone stood still long enough to make the light go off. I am still looking for a simple solution to produce the same effect on turn on, but without the delay.

Fun with LEDs - [Link]

9 Nov 2011

embedded-lab.com writes:

This project describes a motion sensor alarm based on a Passive Infra-Red (PIR) sensor module. There are many vendors that manufacture the PIR sensor modules and almost all of them are pretty much the same in function. They have a single output that goes high (or low, based on specification) when the motion is detected. In this project, a PIC12F635 microcontroller continuously monitors the output from the sensor module and turns a buzzer on when it goes active.

Motion detection alarm using a PIR sensor module with a PIC Microcontroller - [Link]


16 Jun 2011

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

Deepak from Mindfront.net acquired a PIR alarm sensor module which transmitted a digital code over 433 MHz RF to signal an alarm receiver. The problem: he didn’t have the factory receiver. So he set out to sniff the transmitted RF signal using a RCR-433-AS receiver module with the data out fed into an oscilloscope. This allowed him to monitor the digital coded signal pattern and decode it into individual bits.

Hacking a PIR RF signal with PIC 12F683 – [Link]

29 May 2011

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

Sometimes it’s handy to have a message display when persons enter a specific area. Having the message appear only when someone approaches brings more attention it, and can be useful for holiday displays, directions or warnings. In this project by Jer from Volts and Bytes, an Atmega8 is used to activate a Sure Electronics 0832 LED matrix display when motion is detected by the attached PIR sensor.

The C source and supporting files are available in this zip file.

PIR controlled LED matrix display – [Link]

11 Mar 2011

This project describes an automatic light system for kitchen sink where you need sufficient light to properly clean your dishes and vegetables. It uses an ATTiny84 microcontroller with a PIR motion sensor. When motion is detected, the microcontroller turns on the light. The light source consists of 10 bright white LEDs that are driven by a IRF612 MOSFET. One advantage of using a microcontroller is you can create light fade-in and fade-out effects using PWM. [via]

Automate lights in your kitchen area – [Link]

27 Feb 2011

embedded-lab.com writes:

This entry for the 555 timer contest is from Andrew Smith who built a motion activated switch for a digital camera. The 555 timer is operating in monostable mode which is triggered by a PIR sensor when motion is detected. The monostable output of 555 then activates the camera through a remote.

555 Contest Entry: Motion activated camera – [Link]

10 Feb 2011

Jeri (with an I) is back with a new amazing video. This time, she was asked to design a circuit to trigger “artistic” events, when someone approaches. The device had to be inexpensive and small. So Jeri used a PIR sensor to do the job. Watch the following video to see her explaining how these sensors operate and also how can someone use them in a circuit to detect the infrared radiation of our body heat. [via]

Proximity sensor using PIR sensor+theory – [Link]

13 Jan 2011

Jer writes:

Recently, I tested the 0832 LED Matrix Board that I purchased from Sure Electronics. Since I have a simple AVR microcontroller breakout board and a PIR sensor that senses motion, I decided to make something fun using the 0832 LED Matrix Board.

Motion Activated Message Display – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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