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5 Apr 2012

This is the fraAngelico synth by Standuino. He writes – [via]

FraAngelico 8-bit PWM digital synth is unique by the means of its sound generation. It does not use any D/A convertor but the sound is generated by just one digital output pin using Pulse With Modulation which means that by fast changing of different lenghts of pulses we can make different output voltages. Resolution of this technique to achieve different voltage levels is 8-bit but in the true essence the output form the synth is just 1-bit because the output pin does jus 1 or 0 which makes distinctive digital character to its sound.

Although this puristic and minimalistic approach to sound generation, FraAngelico is able to make wide range of different sound colours from powerfull bass to glitchy noises as well as complex rhithmic structures.

This unprocessed raw digital output can be also synchronised with any MIDI device through its MIDI input. To connect standart midi cable use the Standuino MIDI conector (coming very soon) or see tutorial how to connect more standuino devices to you soundcard (coming soon).

fraAngelico Synthesizer by Standuino - [Link]

28 Nov 2011

@Wolfram_Alpha FM Synthesizer – play sin(440 pi t + 16(1 – t) sin(711.92 pi t)) – [via]

@Wolfram_Alpha FM Synthesizer - [Link]

23 Oct 2011

A four part tutorial series on how to make your own SIDcog-based synthesizer with the Propeller Platform. Jeff writes… [via]

dig into the audio abilities of the Propeller Platform with the creation of your own on-screen synthesizer, starting with the basics of sound generation, then into a fully functional instrument capable of creating funky, eight-bit sounds.

Make a Propeller Platform Synth - [Link]

20 Mar 2011

Eric Hsieh and Luke Thomas writes:

Every group wants their final project to be something that will be remembered long after they’re gone. Some do highly sophisticated and complex projects that entail upwards of a hundred hours to complete. Yet others go out of their way to develop something ‘cool’ and ‘fun’. Luke and I decided that we wanted to be in this second category, because developing something that’s ‘cool’ would also be fun to do. So in deciding what to design we tried to think of something that would catch the attention of the people in the lab. The easiest way of doing this is to create something that would make noise or play music so everyone in the lab could enjoy it. Realizing this would be the best way to go, we decided to create a synthesizer that could record and playback notes, ‘teach’ the user how to play a simple melody, and also play some prerecorded tunes. After all, don’t you think being remembered as the group that played back the Imperial March theme from Star Wars is cooler than a paper tape reader? (no offense to those groups doing paper tape readers)

Sine Wave Synthesizer – [Link]


11 Mar 2011

A music synthesizer is Frank’s entry to the 555 contest. He used a 555 timer to make a really cool synthesizer that is played with a stylus and has filtering and volume enveloping features. Various note frequencies are generated with precisely calculated resistances. [via]

555 Contest Entry: Music synthesizer – [Link]

28 Feb 2011

The project intends to record and playback notes as well as some pre-recorded tunes by creating a synthesizer. [via]

Synthesizer Device for Sine Waves – [Link]

10 Aug 2008

The heart of the synthesizer is a set of 2 Analog Devices AD9850 direct digital synthesis (DDS) chips. These provide 2 channels of sinewave output which may differ in frequency and relative phase. The output stage of the synthesizer also includes separate variable attenuators for the 2 channels. These attenuators have a range of 0.0 – 63.9 dB of attenuation, in 0.1 dB steps. The user therefore has control over five parameters: 2 output frequencies, 2 output attenuations, and relative phase between the 2 channels.

Electronic synthesizer – [Link]

5 Mar 2008

usb-dds.jpg

This USB-DDS(Direct Digital Synthesizer) generates sine waves from 0 to 40 MHz with millihertz resolution under computer control. It is useful for amateur radio operators as a reference oscillator.

USB – DDS - [Link]

19 Feb 2008

new-1.jpg

bygselvhifi.dk writes:

I just finished building a frequency synthesizer with the MAX038 waveform generator from MAXIM, you can download the datasheet here: MAX038 High-Frequency Waveform Generator. My circuit is a copy of the high frequency waveform generator in the datasheet, with a 16F877 PIC controlling the device.

Below you can see some pictures of my design (click on the picture to enlarge it):The main PCB, with MAX038 high frequency waveform generator, powersupply and 16F877 PIC controlling the frequency synthesizer. I have detected a small error in the PCB, pin 11 and 12 on the MAX038 IC has to be connected to ground.

Frequency synthesizer with MAX038 - [Link]

4 Feb 2008

 minicontroller_promophoto-thumb.jpg

Here’s another great project PCB from MFOS. The Mini-Controller can be used with any synthesizer with a 1-volt-per-octave input. It uses a stylus probe and PCB keyboard contacts similar to the classic Stylophone synth used by David Bowie. Just to clarify – this is only an interface and doesn’t produce any sound on its own, but it’s probably the simplest DIY synth controller project out there.

Features

  • The MFOS Mini-Controller has a twenty nine note stylus keyboard (C – C – C to E)
  • It can be used to play your Sound Lab Mini-Synth or 1V/Oct modular.
  • The MFOS Mini-Controller supports four CV outputs (2 with portamento 2 without portamento) My prototype (shown) only used two.
  • There is one trigger output and one gate output.
  • Just the coolest thing EVER!

Make a Stylophone-style synth controller - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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