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10 Oct 2014

water-level-controller-arduino

praveen @ circuitstoday.com writes:

This article is a about a fully functional water level controller using Arduino. The circuit displays the level of water in the tank and switches the motor ON when the water level goes below a predetermined level. The circuit automatically switches the motor OFF when the tank is full. The water level and other important data are displayed on a 16×2 LCD display. The circuit also monitors the level of water in the sump tank (source tank). If the level in side the sump tank is low, the motor will not be switched ON and this protects the motor from dry running. A beep sound is generated when the level in the sump tank is low or if there is any fault with the sensors.

Water level controller using arduino - [Link]

7 Aug 2014

20140406_141901-600x450

Kyle wrote an article detailing his DIY automatic water timer:

Now that I have power and output figured out, I need to work on the control aspect. 555 timers are great for simple applications requiring up to a few minutes of delay. At 10 minutes, the RC values needed would boarder the danger zone of the timer not functioning correctly due to the leakage current of the capacitor and the small charge current of the resistor. I could have cascaded two or more timers together but that would be sloppy so I fell back on my trusty friend – the ATtiny micro controller. This would allow me to make changes as I want without redesigning the board.

[via]

DIY automatic water timer - [Link]

30 Jul 2014

photo

Water Level Alarm is a simple project to detect and alarm once the water level in tank or Aquarium reaches at certain level. Circuit is based on popular NPN transistor BC547 which act as switch, Sensor also made on PCB, when the water reaches the sensor PCB, base of transistor connected to positive supply, in consequence transistor act as switch and activate the buzzer.

Water Level Alarm - [Link]

22 May 2014

FXA3HI9HUIWKA3Y.LARGE

singingshark @ instructables.com writes:

Welcome! For our Environmental Capstone class (senior thesis) for St. Olaf College we built a monitor that would effectively monitor how much water a shower uses. For our project we made four different monitors using the same process. This instructable is written as if you were to make a single water monitor. [...]

Shower Monitor Arduino with LCD display - [Link]


20 Sep 2011

[ Osaka Station City ]

“Water printer” - [Link]

16 Sep 2011

Stian wrote up a great post on his own blog explaining how his project works and how you can build your own control hardware. He writes: [via]

A professional sous vide setup costs at least >$1000, so it’s a bit out of reach for the normal home cook – except for the DIYers.. It’s not that hard to build yourself if you put your mind to it. What you need is the following components: Water bath with a electric heater.

  1. Some method of circulating the water.
  2. A way of accurately regulate the heater based on water temperature
  3. Some way of plastic bag packing you meat.

Water bath with heater is easy enough, there are tons of items out there that does this – slow cookers and rice cookers for example. I use a simple rice cooker, the cheaper/simpler the better (we’re going to cycle it’s power on/off, a dumb cooker will behave better facing a power loss). To circulate the water I use a simple ebay aquarium pump (payed $9.90 for mine). To pack the meat in airtight bags you can either buy a cheap vacuum-packer or simply use zip-lock bags (fill your sink with water, add meat to bag, submerge bag in water but keep the opening above waterlevel – pressure from the water will press out all the air, seal the bag..)

SousVide-O-Mator Schematic and Discussion - [Link]

15 Jun 2011

In Los Angeles, we have the “Time-of-Use Program” option from the power company. From their FAQ:

The prices are based on the time of day when the electricity is actually used, unlike the standard rate when the price for electricity is always the same.
A higher price is charged during “high peak” hours, which are between 1:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The price for electricity during these hours is about twice the cost of the standard rate price.
Surrounding these “high peak” hours, are the “low peak” hours. “Low peak” hours are from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and again from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The price for electricity during these hours is slightly higher than the price charged on the standard rate.
During all of the remaining hours, Monday through Friday, and all weekend long, the price for the electricity you use is about one-half of the price for electricity on the standard rate. These hours are called “base” hours.
I was lucky in that my house came with a mechanical timer (as part of some Frankenstein solar system). It was easy to set it to turn off the hot water heater from 1 to 5pm. Don’t forget about daylight saving time, oh how I hate daylight saving time.

This worked fine except for the most weekends we would forget to reach into the box and turn on the hot water before during laundry or grabbing that all important weekend noon shower. Even the ridiculous note didn’t help.

Smarter Water Heater Timer – [Link]

14 Jun 2011

positioning systems I – falling objects from pe lang on Vimeo.

41 Perfectly Sphere Water Droplets Aligned to a Grid… [via]

achine that adds drops of water onto a special textured surface. Each drop forms into an almost perfect sphere through the surface tension of the water and the omniphopic Material. The electronically controlled pipette wanders through a square grid of 21 x 21 drops to form a micro-matrix and returns to the beginning. After approximately 300 minutes, and when the water drops have evaporated, the same process starts again.

41 Perfectly Sphere Water Droplets Aligned to a Grid - [Link]

11 May 2011

avbrand.com writes: [via]

I decided it was time to build an automatic water dish that refills itself. I bought an icemaker water hookup (designed to attach the icemaker in a fridge to the water supply) and my friend Frysteev helped me plumb it in. The tiny 1/4-inch water line runs to the top of my kitchen cabinets, where it enters an irrigation valve ($22). This valve then runs to some clear tubing, down from the cabinets and into the water dish. Also in the water dish are two sensor wires, one at the bottom and one at the top of the dish.

Automatic Pet Water Dish Filler – [Link]

13 Apr 2011

PeckLauros writes:

This invention is not so new but so I took the liberty of posting my symple version, based on IC 4093. With that, I hope no one more is surprised by the lack of water in the water tank, just as I was.

Water tank’s level visualization – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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