Arduino category

Roshamglo Badge, The Rock-Paper-Scissors kit by SparkFun

The SparkFun Roshamglo is the new and fun way to play Rock-Paper-Scissors with your friends! The board uses the ATtiny84, and has an IR LED and receiver to communicate between badges. To play, simply point the USB connector at your opponents Roshamglo up to 5 feet away and press the 5-way switch to the left for rock, up for paper, and right for scissors. The red/green LED will display a solid red for lose, green for win, or alternate red and green for a tie. Your Roshamglo can also be worn with a lanyard clip to provide you easier access when a battle is about to ensue!

The Roshamglo Badge comes as an easy to assemble kit that only requires you to solder on six battery clips to the underside of the board and insert three AAA sized alkaline batteries. No other soldering or programming is required! Once you install the clips and batteries you can start playing Rock Paper Scissors with a friend or start hacking your Roshamglo.

The Roshamglo uses the Micronucleaus bootloader, which allows for programming from the Arduino IDE via the USB connector at the front of the board. We have included two tutorials below to help teach you how to hack your new Roshamglo as well as turn it into a remote to control to turn on and off most styles of televisions!

Features:

  • 8kB of flash memory for our program (~6kB after the bootloader is installed)
  • 512B of SRAM, which stores our variables used in our program
  • 512B of EEPROM
  • 12 IO pins MAX (the Roshamglo breaks out 9 of these pins)
  • 10-bit analog to digital converter which can be used on 8 pins
  • IR LED
  • IR receiver with built in 38kHz demodulator
  • USB programming
  • Programmable red and green LED
  • Power switch
  • 5-way switch for input
  • Reset switch

Roshamglo comes with 3x AAA Alkaline batteries and a 6x AAA battery holder and you can order it now for $12.95.
You can also check the product page for more technical details and source files. Also check this guide to know how to use the Roshmalgo Badge from SparkFun.

Source: SparkFun

Getting Started With BTE13-010 – Arduino Mini Clone

by techrm @ instructables.com

This is a simple guide that will teach you how to get started with this cheap Arduino mini clone, covering all the steps one should do to make it work.

Getting Started With BTE13-010 – Arduino Mini Clone – [Link]

Arduino 433Mhz RF Wireless Data Transfer

runtimeprojects.com has a tutorial on how to use 433Mhz modules to communicate between 2 Arduinos.

The most practical and cool way of sharing data from 1 Arduino to another is by far using a radio transmitter and receiver. The simplest form of wireless transmission (I could find) is the 433Mhz ASK modules. They come in pairs, a receiver and a transmitter. They are ridiculously cheap, selling at $1 or less a pair!!

Arduino 433Mhz RF Wireless Data Transfer – [Link]

How to Make an Arduino Capacitance Meter

circuitbasics.com has a tutorial on how to measure capacitance using arduino.

With all the different ways capacitors are labeled, figuring out the values of your capacitors can be challenging. Especially if you don’t have a digital multi-meter to test them. In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to build three different capacitance meters using an Arduino and a couple resistors. After finishing this project, you’ll be able to measure all of your capacitors and label them for future reference.

How to Make an Arduino Capacitance Meter – [Link]

Start with Arduino in 15 minutes

The ultimate Arduino tutorial for beginners. Learn what Arduino is, how to choose an Arduino, then build a simple data logger, LED dimmer and motor speed controller.

Start with Arduino in 15 minutes – [Link]

Arduino-Programmable ESP32 Development Board

Ezsbc, an American embedded control solutions retailer, had produced a new development board that simplifies working with ESP32 module and makes it programmable via USB using the Arduino IDE.

The ESP32 is a low cost, ultra low power microcontroller with integrated Wi-Fi & dual-mode Bluetooth, which employs a dual-core Tensilica Xtensa LX6 microprocessor. ESP32 is created and developed by Espressif Systems for mobile devices, wearable electronics and IoT applications. It is a successor to the ESP8266 microcontroller.

Other than the ESP32 module, the board has an FTDI FT231XS USB to Serial converter, a 3.3V LDO, reset and flash switches and a multi color LED. The module can be programmed directly from the Arduino environment with 921600 bps upload speed.

It supports auto-download and will automatically be set in download mode by the downloader. Once the download is complete the board will be reset, just like a normal Arduino board.

Features of the ESP32 board:

  • 240 MHz dual core Tensilica LX6 microcontroller with 600 DMIPS
  • Integrated 520 KB SRAM
  • Integrated 802.11BGN HT40 Wi-Fi transceiver, baseband, stack and LWIP
  • Integrated dual mode Bluetooth (classic and BLE)
  • 16 MByte flash
  • 2.2V to 3.6V operating voltage
  • On-board PCB antenna
  • 3 x UARTs, including hardware flow control
  • 3 x SPI
  • 2 x I2S
  • 12 x ADC input channels
  • 2 x DAC
  • 2 x I2C
  • PWM/timer input/output available on every GPIO pin
  • SDIO master/slave 50 MHz
  • Supports external SPI flash up to 16 MB
  • SD-card interface support

The board is available for $17 on tindie store. Datasheet, documentation, and schematics are also available there.

tinyTILE, An Intel Development Board Based on Intel Curie Module

In the past year, Intel announced the low power development board “tinyTILE” which was built based on Intel Curie Module, offering quick and easy identification of actions and motions, features needed by always-on applications.

tinyTile was designed for use in wearable devices and rapid prototyping. It is a 35 x 26 mm board and has an Intel Curie Module on the top and a flat reverse side. There are 20 general purpose I/O pins (four of them are PWM output pins) operate at 3.3V with a maximum of 20 mA current.

The Intel Curie Module is a low-power compute module featuring the low-power 32-bit Intel Quark microcontroller with 384kB flash memory and 80kB SRAM, low-power integrated DSP sensor hub and pattern matching technology, Bluetooth® Low Energy (BLE), and 6-axis combo sensor with accelerometer and gyroscope.

Intel Curie Module Block Diagram

Features of the tinyTILE include:

  • Intel® Curie™ module dual-core (Intel® Quark* processor core and ARC* core)
  • Bluetooth® low energy, 6-axis combo sensor and pattern matching engine
  • 14 digital input/output pins (four can be used as PWM output pins)
  • Four PWM output pins
  • Six analog input pins
  • Strictly 3.3 V I/Os only
  • 20 mA DC current per I/O pin
  • 196 kB Flash memory
  • 24 kB SRAM
  • 32 MHz clock speed
  • USB connector for serial communication and firmware updates (DFU protocol)
  • 35 mm length and 26 mm width

tinyTILE can be powered using the USB connection or by an external battery, and it is compatible with three development environments:

The board is available for around $40 on element14. All related documents, specifications, BOM, BSP and other needed information are available at the official page.

You can view this project that invades your dog’s privacy with impressive ease while you’re at work!

Arduino Interrupts Tutorial

In this video educ8s.tv is going to show us how to use interrupts with Arduino, an advanced but extremely useful feature of the Arduino.

But what is an interrupt? Most microprocessors have interrupts. Interrupts let you respond to external events while doing something else. Suppose you are sitting at home waiting for the new ESP32 board, you have ordered a few days ago, to arrive at your mailbox. You are very excited so you check your mailbox every ten minutes to see if the board has arrived. This procedure is called polling, and we were using this technique a lot in our projects. But what if we had told the mailman to ring the doorbell at his arrival? This way, we are free to do anything we want and at the time the board arrives at the mailbox we get notified and we can use it at once. This example explains exactly how an interrupt causes a processor to act.

Arduino Interrupts Tutorial [Link]

RELATED POSTS

Pixel 2.0, Arduino Zero-Like Board With Smart Display

The Pixel is an Arduino-compatible smart display, combining a 32-bit Cortex M0+ MCU with 32K of RAM, a 1.5″ 128×128 color OLED screen, and a microSD slot all in one package.

This is Rabid Prototypes’ second iteration of Pixel, which originally raised nearly $10,000 on Kickstarter back in 2015. The board offers a number of potential use cases, ranging from wearable devices, to sensor data monitors, to retro video game consoles.

The Pixel is compatible with Arduino’s SPI and SD libraries, as well as Adafruit’s graphics library, which provides functions for blitting images, drawing primitives like lines and circles, and even includes bitmapped font support.

Additionally, if you ever need to modify the fuses or bootloader, the Pixel features a standard SWD header that can be used with Microchip’s Atmel-ICE development tool.

Here are the technical specifications of Pixel:

  • Microcontroller: Atmel ATSAMD21G18 ARM Cortex M0+
  • Clock speed: 48 MHz
  • Operating voltage: 3.3V
  • I/O pin limits: 3.3V, 7 mA
  • Digital I/O pins: 14, with 12 PWM
  • Analog input pins: 6, 12-bit ADC channels
  • Analog output pins: 1, 10-bit DAC
  • Flash memory: 256 KB
  • SRAM: 32 KB
  • Voltage regulator: 3.7V – 5.5V input / 3.3V, 300mA output
  • PCB Dimensions: 1.8 x 1.8″ (46mm x 46mm)
  • Display : 128×128 16-bit color 1.5″ (38mm) OLED w/ SSD1351 driver

Pixel is now live on Kickstarter! you can get your own Pixel 2.0 for $75 or two for only $135. The campaign still has 12 days to go, check its video to know further details about Pixel 2.0:

Source: Hackster Blog

 

Simple 3 phase Arduino energy meter

Simple 3 Phase Arduino energy meter from The DIY Life:

Again, with this meter I was going for simplicity. Sure, for perfectly accurate measurements you need to measure both the supply current and voltage but for this application and in the interests of keeping the energy meter simple and safe – only requiring a non-contact connection to your mains – I’ve decide to stick with a simple current measurement which gives you an estimate to within a couple of decimal points of a kilowatt hour.
This meter measures the supply current through each phase using a CT (current transformer) and then does a few calculations to give you the current, power, maximum power and kilowatt hours consumed for each phase.

Simple 3 phase Arduino energy meter – [Link]