Arduino category

Adafruit Metro 328 – An Arduino Uno Compatible Development Board

The Adafruit Metro 328 development board is an alternative to the Arduino Uno with an equivalent and compatible board design. It’s designed and manufactured by Adafruit. The Metro 328 just like other Arduino Uno clones is also based on the famous Atmega 328P that has been used in various development boards and projects.

Adafruit Metro 328

The Metro 328 offers an ATmega328 microcontroller with Optiboot (UNO) Bootloader and a ton of other features you won’t find on the Arduino Uno board. The Metro board is equipped with 19 GPIO pins unlike the Arduino Uno 14, analog inputs, UART, SPI, I2C, timers, and PWM. Six of its GPIO pins are for Analog input with two reserved for the USB to Serial Converter. Just like the standard Arduino Uno, it also includes 6 PWM pins on 2x 8bit timers and 1x 16bit timers.

Another significant distinction between the Metro and the Arduino Uno is the USB to Serial converter. The Arduino Uno is based on the Atmega USB-UART bridge (ATMEGA16U2), but the Metro 328 is based on the FTDI FT231X that provides excellent driver support in all operating systems with a more reliable data transfer unlike the former. It comes with four indicator LEDs, on the front edge of the PCB, for easy debugging. One green power LED, two RX/TX LEDs for the UART, and a red LED connected to pin PB5.

The Metro board has an on and off switch for the DC jack so you can turn off your setup easily. It also uses the conventional micro USB connector found around. Even though the Logic level of the Metro is 5V, it can be converted to 3.3v logic by cutting and soldering a closed jumper.

The following are the Metro 328P specifications:

  • ATmega328 microcontroller with Optiboot (UNO) Bootloader
  • USB Programming and debugging via the well-supported genuine FTDI FT231X
  • Input voltage: 7-9V (a 9VDC power supply is recommended)
  • 5V regulator can supply peak ~800mA as long as the die temp of the regulator does not exceed 150*C
  • 3.3V regulator can supply peak ~150mA as long as the die temp of the regulator does not exceed 150*C
  • 5V logic with 3.3V compatible inputs can be converted to 3.3V logic operation
  • 20 Digital I/O Pins: 6 are also PWM outputs, and 6 are also Analog Inputs
  • 6-pin ICSP Header for reprogramming
  • 32KB Flash Memory – 0.5K for bootloader, 31.5KB available after bootloading
  • 16MHz Clock Speed
  • Compatible with “Classic” and “R3” Shields
  • Adafruit Black PCB with gold plate on pads
  • 53mm x 71mm / 2.1″ x 2.8″
  • Height (w/ barrel jack): 13mm / 0.5″
  • Weight: 19g

The Metro 328 board is now available with headers already in place for $19.50 directly from the online Adafruit store. If you don’t want a Metro with the headers attached for super-slimness, check out the Metro without Headers.

Arduino Communication with an Android App via Bluetooth

With the arrival of the IoT and the need for control, devices now need to do more than perform the basic functions for which they are built, they need to be capable of communicating with other devices like a mobile phone among others. There are different communication systems which can be adapted for communication between devices, they include systems like WiFi, RF, Bluetooth among several others. Our focus will be on communication over Bluetooth.

Today we will be building an Arduino based project which communicates with an app running on a smartphone (Android) via Bluetooth.

Arduino Communication with an Android App via Bluetooth – [Link]

ESP32 Deep Sleep Tutorial for Low Power Projects

Our friends on educ8s.tv uploaded a new video. Check it out.

Welcome to this ESP32 Deep Sleep tutorial with the Arduino IDE! Today we are going to learn how to put the ESP32 chip into the Deep Sleep mode in order to conserve power and make our projects battery friendly. There is a lot to cover so let’s get started! The ESP32 chip is a fantastic new chip with great features. It offers a lot of processing power, two 32 bit cores, a lot of memory, Bluetooth and WiFi in a small and easy to use chip. One of the most interesting things about the ESP32 chip is that it offers a low-power deep sleep mode which is very easy to use. Let’s see how to use it.

ESP32 Deep Sleep Tutorial for Low Power Projects – [Link]

RGB Led Driver Shield for Arduino Nano

This is my second project for LED Driver based on CAT4101 IC. The first project was for single White LED. This project has been designed to drive 3 channels of RGB LEDs with PWM signal which helps to create multi-color LED light. Arduino Nano is used to generate PWM signals for RGB LEDs and board has 3 tactile switches and Analog signal input to develop various RGB LED related applications. Each channel can drive load up to 1A and input supply up to 12V DC. 1A X 3 Constant current LED driver shield for Arduino Nano has been designed for verity of LED related applications. The shield provides accurate LED current sink to regulate LED current in a string of LEDs. The LED current is mirrored and the current flowing from the RSET is set by PR1. On board 2W X 3 LED are used for testing purposes.

RGB Led Driver Shield for Arduino Nano – [Link]

Arduino UV Meter using the UV30A Ultraviolet Sensor

Ultraviolet rays, also known as UV for short are rays emitted by sun. Due to the depletion of the ozone layer, these rays tend to get to extreme levels that could lead to sunburns etc for those under it, that’s why daily and hourly forecast of the UV index is always available to help people keep track and stay safe. For monitoring purposes, why not own a personal UV meter?

Today, we will build a UV meter using the Arduino and the ultraviolet sensor (UVM30A) with a Nokia 5110 LCD display as the display for the meter. The Nokia 5110 is used to display the UV index which is an international standard unit for the intensity of ultraviolet rays from the sun being experienced in a particular place and at a particular time.

Arduino UV Meter using the UV30A Ultraviolet Sensor – [Link]

SensiBLEduino

SensiBLEduino – A full fledge ‘hardware-ready’ development kit for IoT and supports Arduino

IoT which translates to the Internet of Things has been a significant buzz for the last five years while disrupting major Industries (from Agriculture, Energy, Healthy, Sports and several others).

SensiBLEduino
SensiBLEduino Development Kit

IoT adoption has seen rapid development in the makers’ world, with different makers and manufacturers producing various forms of boards, chips, software to facilitate quick IoT development. Boards like ESP8266 from Espressif System is used for rapid prototyping and a low-cost choice for Wi-Fi-based IoT applications. Israeli based IoT firm SensiEdge has launched the SensiBLEDuino, an off-the-shelf, hardware-ready development kit based on the open-source Arduino for rapid prototyping of IoT applications.

SensiBLE is a full fledge customizable solution for those wanting to design IoT products. It helps to fasten development with a variety of sensors onboard, along with Bluetooth LE 4.1 capabilities and a low-power ARM® 32-bit Cortex®-M4 CPU with FPU. Some of the main challenges when embarking on IoT product development are; what platform will I use? What sensors are available to achieve my goal(s)? How do I handle connectivity? What about the Cloud Platform to use, and so on. Developers or product designer always result in the use of several boards or modules to achieve this while also increasing the time to bring the product to life. The SensiBLE kit removes most of these fears; it combines hardware and software in tiny form factor to allow developers get their product to market quickly at lower development costs. (more…)

Simple Arduino Data Logger

Schematics

A data logger is an electronic device or instrument that records data over a period of time. It allows the user to record time or location stamped data which can be viewed at a later time or real time.

Irrespective of the type of data being logged or the kind of data logger, these devices usually contain two main units, the sensor unit and the storage/communication unit. The sensor unit may involve the use of an external instrument or a sensor embedded within the device. Increasingly, but not entirely, data logging devices are becoming more based on micro processors and microcontrollers, which has opened up a whole new level of data gathering and storage.

Simple Arduino Data Logger – [Link]

Interfacing Arduino with Micro SD card Module

We published a new tutorial in partnership with Nik Koumaris from educ8s.tv.

Often, we have the need for a way to store data in our projects, and most of the time, the EEPROM has not enough storage and the storage size is limited. It also has issues with the format and nature of data it can hold, all this and more makes it probably not the best for storing data like text, CSV, audio, video or image files. To get around this we could use an SD card to store the data, and remove the card when we need to view on some other platform etc. That is why today’s project is focusing on how to interface an SD card module with an Arduino.

Interfacing the Arduino with the Micro SD card Module – [Link]

ESP32 E-Paper Thermometer with a DS18B20 Sensor

Our friends on educ8s.tv published a new video. Check it out.

In this ESP32 project video, we are going to use an E-Paper display and a DS18B20 temperature sensor to build a low-power thermometer. We are going to use the Arduino IDE to program to ESP32 board. ! It is a very easy project to build. It won’t take us more than 5 minutes so let’s get started!

ESP32 E-Paper Thermometer with a DS18B20 Sensor – [Link]

Driving an 8×8 (64) LED Matrix with MAX7219 (or MAX7221) and Arduino Uno

8×8 matrix Demo

Hi guys, today we will be focusing on displaying mini graphics and texts on an 8×8 LED matrix using the MAX7219 (or MAX7221) LED driver and the Arduino Uno.

The 8×8 LED matrix displays are usually used for the display of symbols, simple graphics and texts. Made of super bright LEDs, they produce low resolution display and can be daisy chained to produce larger displays.

To enable us to control the display easily, we will be using the MAX7219/MAX7221 LED display driver module. Although this driver comes attached to the LED Matrix display that we will be using for this tutorial, its important to treat them separately, so you can understand how the LED driver works and be able to use it in case you are unable to get an 8×8 LED Matrix display that comes with the LED Driver.

Driving an 8×8 (64) LED Matrix with MAX7219 (or MAX7221) and Arduino Uno – [Link]