Arduino category

How To Program ATtiny13/ATtiny13a using Arduino IDE

Despite ATtiny series is considered extremely cheap and useful, still there is a lack of projects and tutorials about it. In this tutorial, you will learn how to start building applications using ATtiny13 microcontroller programmed using Arduino IDE.

First of all, ATtiny13 is a low-power CMOS 8-bit microcontroller based on the AVR enhanced RISC architecture. By executing powerful instructions in a single clock cycle, the ATtiny13 achieves throughput approaching 1 MIPS per MHz allowing the system designer to optimize power consumption versus processing speed. After the acquisition of Atmel by Microchip, the new ATtiny13 is still in production.

How To Program ATtiny13/ATtiny13a using Arduino IDE – [Link]

Open Board for 3D Gesture Control, Motion Capturing, Tracking and Robotics

Next Industries show off The Tactigon: the perfect link between humans or objects and the digital world, with its IMU 3D features, environmental sensors and Bluetooth 4.0 technology.

The Tactigon is a unique platform, programmable with Arduino IDE and expandable with GPS, LoRa or SIGFOX communication add on; it’s made for unlimited applications both in the industrial  and in the consumer IoT worlds.  Action, gesture, motion, and  robots can be kept under control through a  wearable,  small but powerful electronic board. It is small, rectangular, with a lot of sensors inside, wireless, low power consumption and also wearable. With the above mentioned six features, this device is the perfect tool to test ideas and bring projects to life. The Tactigon measures linear and angular motion through 3 axis gyroscope and 3 axis accelerometer; an extra 3 axis magnetic sensor is included to provide more precision. Environmental sensors are on board, so temperature and barometric pressure data recording can be easily provided, like also out of the box communication through low energy Bluetooth 4.0, and optional available GPS, SIGFOX and LoRa.

Open Board for 3D Gesture Control, Motion Capturing, Tracking and Robotics – [Link]

Turn Your Fidget Spinner Into A Vision Display

Fidget spinner became a popular toy earlier in 2017. Most of us have one or at least have tried it. Consists of a bearing surrounded by a three-lobed flat structure, it can spin along its axis with a little effort.

Makers and hardware hackers always try to employ different tools to make innovative ideas. Some of those makers hacked a fidget spinner to display custom text while it is rotating. The concept is using a vector of LEDs and turn them on and off at each degree according to the required text. Then, when it rotates very fast our eyes will see the full text as it is displayed together.

At this project on HackadaySean Hodgins created a fidget-shape PCB that fits into the spinner. It consists of an 8-LED vector, a 32-bit microcontroller, an 8-bit shift register, and other electronics parts. It is powered by three 3.6 LiPo cell batteries and can be connected with PC through a micro USB connector.

Component needed for this project:

The total cost is about $20 for all parts, and here is the bill of materials. Also the design of the fidget is available for 3D printing for both the body and the caps. In addition, the microcontroller can be programmed simply with Arduino IDE.

Since this project is fully open source, all resources and files are available for download. The github repository includes the CAD files, firmware code and libraries, PCB design, and some pictures.

Although it is a brilliant project, similar projects had been developed before and had started  funding campaigns. But unfortunately, they weren’t successful and didn’t reach their fund goal.

Finally, if you like this idea you can make it by yourself with the help of this video, which describes how to make it and how it works:

HOW-TO: Music Reactive Desk Light

@ natural-nerd.com build a sound reacting LED light using Arduino:

Hi! In this build we’ll make a good looking light that dances to all sounds and music, using simple components and some basic Arduino programming. It makes an awesome effect while standing on the desk when gaming, playing music, and anything else that makes sound really. Let’s get going!

HOW-TO: Music Reactive Desk Light – [Link]

Arduino PICO, The Tiny Arduino-Compatible Board

MellBell, the Canadian-based hardware and electronics company, has launched their first product: Arduino PICO!

At first, the company says that Arduino PICO is the smallest Arduino compatible board ever, since it is 0.6″ x 0.6″ inch sized (~15mm squared). This tiny fully-fledged arduino-compatible board has a Leonardo-compatible 16MHz ATMEGA32U4 chip and a micro-USB port. The main cause of building PICO was to have a really small brain to use in many application with worrying about size or allocated space.

PICO’s Technical Specifications

The 16MHz ATMEGA32U4 integrates 2.5KB SRAM and 32KB flash, 4KB of which the bootloader uses. The 1.1-gram PICO has 8x digital I/O pins, 3x analog inputs, a PWM channel, and a reset button. In addition, the board has a 7-12V power with 5V operating voltage, where each I/O pin uses 40mA. It is worth to mention that PICO is competing with 12 x 12mm, $18 µduino, which similarly offers an Arduino Leonardo compatible ATMEGA32U4 MCU and which is smaller in size.

Moreover, MellBell provides an aluminum version that comes with the same ATMEGA32u4 core processor. With an Aluminum not regular fiber-glass, this makes PICO more reliable for overheated applications and environments.

Arduino PICO is now live on a Kickstarter campaign that two days ago had achieved its goal! Fortunately, there is still a chance until 17 Aug 2017 to pre-order one of PICO’s packages. You can get your early bird PICO for CA$18 ($14) and Aluminum edition for CA$32($25). Also, there is a special edition that includes  Aluminium PICO, four colored PICOs,  PICO joystick shield, micro drone kit, PICO solar station,  dual PICO board,  micro li-ion battery, PICO starter kit,  MiniMega board and finally a special “THANK YOU” video for CA$ 960 ($765).

Check out the campaign video:

Romeo BLE

Romeo BLE – An Arduino Based Powerful Robot Control Board With Bluetooth 4.0

Romeo BLE is an all-in-one Arduino based control board specially designed for robotics applications from DFRobot. This platform is open source and it’s powered by thousands of publicly available open-sourced codes. Romeo BLE can easily be expanded using Arduino shields. The most important feature—Bluetooth 4.0 wireless communication, allows the board to receive commands via Bluetooth. So, users can now use their smartphone, tablet, or computer to interact with the control board.

Control Robot From Smartphones by Bluetooth 4.0
Control Robot From Smartphones by Bluetooth 4.0

Even the codes can be uploaded over Bluetooth a USB Bluno Link adapter, without requiring any wired USB connection between the board and a PC. This is a great advantage for mobile applications where codes are debugged and uploaded frequently.

The Romeo BLE also includes two integrated two-channel DC motor drivers and wireless sockets, which makes project development more hassle-free. One can start the project immediately without needing an additional motor driver circuitry. The motor driving section also supports extra servos which need more current.

There are two ways to power the Romeo BLE board. But, the polarity must be correct. Otherwise, the board may get permanently damaged as there exists no reverse polarity protection. The two powering methods are:

  • Power from USB: Plug in the USB cable to the Romeo controller from a power source (i.e. wall jack or computer). If the input voltage and current are sufficient, the Romeo BLE board should turn on and a LED should light up. While powered from USB, do NOT connect anything else like motor, servo etc. except LED. Because the USB can only provide 500mA current which is certainly not enough for driving loads like motors.
  • Power from External Power Supply: Connect the ground wire from your supply to the screw terminal labeled “GND” on Romeo board, and then connect the positive wire from your supply to the screw terminal labeled “VIN”. The maximum acceptable input voltage is 23 volts. Do not exceed this value anyway.
Romeo BLE Board Pin Diagram
Romeo BLE Board Pin Diagram

Specifications:

  • Microcontroller: ATmega328P
  • Bootloader: Arduino UNO
  • Onboard BLE chip: TI CC2540
  • 14 Digital I/O ports
  • 6 PWM Outputs (Pin11, Pin10, Pin9, Pin6, Pin5, Pin3)
  • 8 10-bit analog input ports
  • 3 I2Cs
  • 5 Buttons
  • Power Supply Port: USB or DC2.1
  • External Power Supply Range: 5-23V
  • DC output: 5V/3.3V
  • Size: 94mm x 80mm

Features:

  • Auto sensing/switching external power input
  • Transmission range: 70m in free space
  • Support Bluetooth remote update the Arduino program
  • Support Bluetooth HID
  • Support iBeacons
  • Support AT command to config the BLE
  • Support Transparent communication through Serial
  • Support the master-slave machine switch
  • Support USB update BLE chip program
  • Support Male and Female Pin Header
  • Two-way H-bridge motor Driver with 2A maximum current
  • Integrated sockets for APC220 RF Module

You can program Romeo BLE using Arduino IDE version 1.8.1 or above. Select Arduino UNO from Tools –> Boards in the IDE. Go to arduino.en.cc to download the latest version of Arduino IDE. Read the Romeo BLE wiki to learn more.

Edgefx Kits, Get Your DIY Project Kit Now!

Aiming to bridge the gap between the academics and industry in electronics, communication and electrical sectors, Edgefx Technologies was born at 2012 as an online store for project solutions.

Edgefx provides practical skill building solutions to the engineering students in the form of Do It Yourself (DIY) project kits. These kits support wide areas of electronics and communication, and also the latest trends like IoT, Android, Arduino, Raspberry Pi and many more.

Edgefx kits are easy to use and self-explanatory. They come with hardware and training material in the form of extensive audio-visuals and can be purchased online.

The company has grown to have a very strong focus on customer service, quality and morale of the staff and most of all, a passion for what we do. And although we’re a team of almost 30 right now, nothing about us is corporate. We don’t have multiple tiers of hierarchy. The vast majority of our employees work on the front lines, taking care of our customers or shipping items out of the Edgefx Fulfillment Centers.

The website contains more than 200 projects in about 15 different categories. Kits prices range from Rs. 1500 to Rs. 50000 (~ $23 to $750). In addition to the project kits, Edgefx also conducts practical workshops in colleges and schools.

School students, starting from 8 years old, can opt for school electronic projects that empowering them to innovate. It includes three basic level STEM kits and one intermediate level kit. All of these kits are edutainment and fun, with real time applications using latest technologies, and also can create multiple experiments.

Each basic kit has a three project inside, these projects are:

  • Security protection for museum items
  • Touch controlled fan
  • Touch me not LED warning
  • Bike theft alarm
  • Upside down  indicator for fragile item
  • Toll gate auto light LED
  • Security area protecting alarm
  • Auto door opening motor
  • Human detection under debries

The intermediate kit is an Arduino project kit. This project is designed for digital sensors solder-less Arduino projects on breadboard. It will light flasher of different color light on single LED each time on sensing finger swipe with the help of IR obstacle sensor. Also, the project makes different unique sounds on sensing each time.

Beginners Arduino Project Kit

So, if you are searching for some project kits you have to visit the Edgefx store, explore the kits to find the project you want to make and then order it. In the end, don’t forget to share with us your experience once you buy and use the kit!

Visual Studio Code Extension for Arduino is now open sourced!

Visual Studio Code is the cross-platform, open sourced advanced code editor by Microsoft.

Recently, after being interested in IoT and hardware, Microsoft is now searching for tools to make building IoT devices easier. It added an Arduino extension to its Visual Studio Code to enable a better eco-system for IoT developers using Arduino. By making some research about some challenges usually developers face, Microsoft found out that giving more access to new features and capabilities will be a pain killer for IoT enthusiasts. Later on, Microsoft had opened the source of the Arduino extension and placed it on GitHub.

 

Our Arduino extension fully embraces the Arduino developer community and is almost fully compatible and consistent with the official Arduino IDE. On top of it, we added the most sought-after features, such as IntelliSense, Auto code completion, and on-device debugging for supported boards.

Core functionalities of Arduino extension

  • IntelliSense and syntax highlighting for Arduino sketches
  • Built-in board and library manager
  • Verify and upload your sketches in Visual Studio Code
  • Built-in example list
  • Snippets for sketches
  • Built-in serial monitor
  • Automatic Arduino project scaffolding
  • Command Palette (F1) integration of frequently used commands (e.g. Verify, Upload…)
  • Integrated Arduino Debugging (New)

Of course, you can download this extension from Visual Studio Code Marketplace at: https://aka.ms/arduino.

Fortunately, Microsoft had open sourced this project on GitHub under MIT License. Thus, if you are developer, you are more than welcome to participate in developing this extension and here how you can help:

  • File a bug, submit a feature request, you can find the current bug/issue list and feature requests at GitHub’s issue tracker.
  • Join developers and users’ discussions at chat on gitter.
  • Fork the repository, fix bugs and send pull requests
  • Fork the repository, add your new cool features and send pull requests.

Finally, more detailed instructions are available at the Visual Studio Code Repo at GitHub.

Control Your IR Devices With Your Smartphone Bluetooth

Managing some of house devices with its IR remotes may be annoying if you are out of its line of sight. You will have to interrupt the work you are doing, move to another room, turn down the volume of your Hi-Fi for example, then go back and resume your work. Assume you can use bluetooth instead of this process, it will be a time saver and it will maintain your focus.

Using an Arduino UNO with IR and Bluetooth shields, you can create your own bluetooth-controlled general purpose remote control. Bluetooth is a good choice because it doesn’t need any active network to connect with a mobile device. Connection between them is direct (point-to-point) and is suitable for small areas. However, by using a wireless shield you will be able to control the devices through the internet.

A project by Open Electronics demonstrates how to build and program such a device. Its hardware side consists of an Arduino with two shields, and the software side is an Android application. The tutorial shows in details how each shield will work, and also how to setup and prepare the mobile application.

Parts needed for the project:

  • An Arduino Uno board or equivalent (e.g. Fishino Uno);
  • An ArdIR shield:An Arduino shield that allows creating a programmable infrared universal remote manageable from the Internet. It simulates the remote control of TVs, home appliances and air conditioners, by transmitting the same data to the desired.
  • A Bluetooth shield:
    A shield for Arduino based on the RN-42 module. It also has a dip switch that allows you to set up the modes of operation of the module RN-42.
  • A smartphone or tablet with Android OS (version 4.1 or higher), of course complete with a Bluetooth interface.

The mobile application is compatible with Android OS devices of version 4.1 (jellybean) and higher. It needs two phases to be handled:

  1. Research and connection to the target Bluetooth device.
  2. Selection and activating one of the channels, for transmitting the code to the shield.

Once the connection with the Bluetooth shield is established and the channel is selected, the program will be ready to handle a subsequent command by the user and will be listening to possible result messages returned by the remote Bluetooth device.

There is no need for additional hardware parts and work, you only have  to assemble both shields on the Arduino board. But before that, you have to upload a sketch to Arduino for handling the ArdIR shield and managing the communication with the Bluetooth shield.

For more information about how the project works, the structure of the application and source files, you can read the original guide.

RandA, Combining Raspberry Pi & Arduino

Two years ago, open electronics had produced “RandA“, an Atmega328-based board for Raspberry Pi to deliver the advantages of both, Raspberry Pi and Arduino. Earlier this month, an updated version of RandA has been released to be compatible with Raspberry Pi 3.

RandA is a development board that leverages the hardware equipment and the computing power of Arduino with its shields, and the enormous potential of the Raspberry Pi. It features Atmega328 microcontroller, has RTC (Real Time Clock) module, power button and sleep timer, connectors for 5 volts and connectors for mounting Arduino shield.

Combining these two platforms is a way to exploit specific characteristics of both. Raspberry Pi could use Arduino as configurable device, and Arduino might work as a controller for Raspberry Pi allowing access to complex environments like the network, allowing complex processing or access to multimedia.

RandA was created at first for Raspberry Pi 2 and B+, using the first 20 pins to connect them, the serial port for programming the Atmega328 and for communication with Raspberry Pi. With the enhancements that come with the third version of Raspberry Pi, such as upgrading CPU to a quad-core 64 bit ARMv8 clocked at 1.2 GHz and adding WiFi and Bluetooth transceivers, there were some structure modifications that require updating the RandA.

Raspberry Pi 3 uses the standard UART0 serial port for connection via the Bluetooth interface equipping version 3. Therefore, it is no longer available on GPIO14/15 as it was in the first and second version of Raspberry Pi. The secondary UART1 serial is configured on those pins instead, but this serial port is based on a simulated serial not on a preset UART hardware. In particular, its clock is connected to the frequency of the clock of the system which varies in function of the load in order to save energy.

To solve this, the software is configured to recover the UART0 on GPIO 14/15 pins without modifying any hardware parts. This way will disable the Bluetooth peripheral, but the WiFi is still working and you can use Bluetooth by connecting a Bluetooth dongle via USB.

To know more about the new version of RandA you can review this post, and reading this post to learn more about RandA in general. You can get your RandA board for about $36 and this tutorial will help you get starting with it.