Tag Archives: Arduino

Meet Spritzer, Sony New Arduino

Sony has recently launched one of its new products, Spritzer! Spritzer is an Arduino-compatible board for IoT applications that has built-in GPS, audio codec, and low power consumption.

While it is Arduino-compatible, the board allows any developer to easily start app development using the free Arduino IDE and an ordinary USB cable. In fact, the board features a processing chip with a unique combination of low power consumption and a rapid clock speed of 156MHz. Thus, it is extremely versatile and it can be deployed for a vast range of use cases.

For the first time, the company demonstrated the board at Tokyo Maker Faire last month with a drone utilizing the GPS and the 6-axis sensor support, a smart speaker utilizing the audio functions, a self-driving line-tracing miniature car, and a low-power smart sensing IoT camera using the camera interface of Spritzer.

Sony Spritzer specifications

  • MCU – Sony CDX5602 ARM Cortex-M4F ×6 micro-controller clocked at up to 156 MHz with 1.5MB SRAM
  • Storage – 8MB Flash Memory, micro SD card
  • GNSS – GPS, GLONASS, supported
  • Audio – 3.5mm audio jack
  • Expansion I/Os
    • Digital I/O Pins – SPI, I2C, UART, PWM ×4 (3.3V)
    • Analog Pins – 6ch (3.3V range)
    • Audio I/O – 8ch Digital MICs or 4ch Analog MICs, Stereo Speaker, I2S, CXD5247 audio codec with 192 kHz/24bit High-Resolution audio
    • 2x camera interfaces
  • USB – 1x micro USB port for programming
Spritzer Block Diagram

“You’ll have to connect external module to get Bluetooth, WiFi, and LTE, a display up to 360×240 resolution can be used via SPI, all sort of sensors can be connected via the expansion header, the board is suitable for microphone arrays, and it can be powered by batteries thanks to a charger circuit and fuel gauge inside CXD5247 audio codec / PMU chip.” – CNXSoft

More details about the board will be available by 2018. Until then, check this Japanese official page about Spritzer, or this translated page.

Learn Arduino Easily with The Arduino Inventor’s Guide

Are you looking for Arduino tutorials? Already over-whelmed by the guides and videos available on the internet? Sparkfun is making Arduino and electronics easier for you with its new book ” The Arduino Inventor’s Guide”!

First of all, the authors of this book , Brian Huang and Derek Runberg, are both working in the department of Education at SparkFun Electronics. Since they are experienced in electronics and educating engineering in schools, they are working towards making electronics easy and fun.

In fact, this 10-project guide is a project-packed introduction to building and coding with Arduino microcontroller. With each hands-on project, total beginners learn useful electronics and coding skills while building an interactive gadgets. Accordingly, this guide is within the introductory-level educational series introduced by No Starch Press and Sparkfun.

“We wanted to share the magic that happens when you build something interactive with electronics,” says Huang. “The goal is to teach real, valuable hardware skills, one project at a time,” adds Runberg.

Content of the book

  • Introduction
  • Electronics Primer
    101 electronics
  • Project 1: Getting Started with Arduino
    Blinking an LED
  • Project 2: A Stoplight for Your House
    A miniature traffic light
  • Project 3: The Nine-Pixel Animation Machine
    An LED screen that displays animated patterns and shapes
  • Project 4: Reaction Timer
    A fast-paced button-smashing game to test your reflexes
  • Project 5: A Color-Mixing Night-Light
    A light-sensitive, color-changing night-light
  • Project 6: Balance Beam
    A challenging ball-balancing game
  • Project 7: Tiny Desktop Greenhouse
    A temperature-sensing mini greenhouse with an automated fan and vent
  • Project 8: Drawbot, the Robotic Artist
    A motorized robot that you can control
  • Project 9: Drag Race Timer
    A racing timer for toy cars
  • Project 10: Tiny Electric Piano
    A tiny electric piano that you can actually play!
  • Appendix: More Electronics Know-How

Reviews

The Arduino Inventor’s Guide will appeal to the gadget freak as well as those who like to put their own spin on things.” —Microcontroller Tips

“This is probably the best Arduino starter book out there! I highly recommend it for every library and classroom.” —Sequential Tart

To sum up, the book is available for $30 on No Starch Press as a printed book and for $25 as an Ebook. In addition, you can check this page for more insights. Also download Project 2: A Stoplight for Your House, and the sketches, templates, and diagrams used in this book.

1Amp Constant Current LED Driver Shield for Arduino Nano

1A Constant current LED driver shield for Arduino Nano has been designed for verity of LED related applications. The shield provides accurate LED current sink to regulate LED current in a string of LEDs or single LED. The LED current is mirrored from the current flowing from the RSET Preset PR1. On board 1W LED is used for testing purpose. External high Wattage LED or multiple LED string can be connected by pulling two wires from the PCB and this shield fit directly on back side of Arduino Nano. Shield also has on board tactile switch connected to Digital D2 pin using pull down resistor if required for any application. On board preset helps to set the maximum constant current. PWM input pin connected to Digital pin D6 of Nano to control the LED intensity. Example code FADE-IN/FADEOUT helps to test the shield.

1Amp Constant Current LED Driver Shield for Arduino Nano – [Link]

How To Program ATtiny13/ATtiny13a using Arduino IDE

Despite ATtiny series is considered extremely cheap and useful, still there is a lack of projects and tutorials about it. In this tutorial, you will learn how to start building applications using ATtiny13 microcontroller programmed using Arduino IDE.

First of all, ATtiny13 is a low-power CMOS 8-bit microcontroller based on the AVR enhanced RISC architecture. By executing powerful instructions in a single clock cycle, the ATtiny13 achieves throughput approaching 1 MIPS per MHz allowing the system designer to optimize power consumption versus processing speed. After the acquisition of Atmel by Microchip, the new ATtiny13 is still in production.

How To Program ATtiny13/ATtiny13a using Arduino IDE – [Link]

LiDAR board is only 25x21x8mm

Dinesh Bhatia @ indiegogo.com writes:

tinyLiDAR provides Arduino users simplified access to cutting-edge smartphone-technology. Don’t pull your hair out! Now you can use ST’s latest Time-of-Flight sensor easily with tinyLiDAR. Its the low cost “easy button” of distance sensors. We’ve put all the smarts inside our onboard 32-bit micro so you won’t have to dedicate your Arduino to the task. Ultra-fast, fully-featured, accurate, low power and low cost – what more could you ask for?

LiDAR board is only 25x21x8mm – [Link]

Open Board for 3D Gesture Control, Motion Capturing, Tracking and Robotics

Next Industries show off The Tactigon: the perfect link between humans or objects and the digital world, with its IMU 3D features, environmental sensors and Bluetooth 4.0 technology.

The Tactigon is a unique platform, programmable with Arduino IDE and expandable with GPS, LoRa or SIGFOX communication add on; it’s made for unlimited applications both in the industrial  and in the consumer IoT worlds.  Action, gesture, motion, and  robots can be kept under control through a  wearable,  small but powerful electronic board. It is small, rectangular, with a lot of sensors inside, wireless, low power consumption and also wearable. With the above mentioned six features, this device is the perfect tool to test ideas and bring projects to life. The Tactigon measures linear and angular motion through 3 axis gyroscope and 3 axis accelerometer; an extra 3 axis magnetic sensor is included to provide more precision. Environmental sensors are on board, so temperature and barometric pressure data recording can be easily provided, like also out of the box communication through low energy Bluetooth 4.0, and optional available GPS, SIGFOX and LoRa.

Open Board for 3D Gesture Control, Motion Capturing, Tracking and Robotics – [Link]

Turn Your Fidget Spinner Into A Vision Display

Fidget spinner became a popular toy earlier in 2017. Most of us have one or at least have tried it. Consists of a bearing surrounded by a three-lobed flat structure, it can spin along its axis with a little effort.

Makers and hardware hackers always try to employ different tools to make innovative ideas. Some of those makers hacked a fidget spinner to display custom text while it is rotating. The concept is using a vector of LEDs and turn them on and off at each degree according to the required text. Then, when it rotates very fast our eyes will see the full text as it is displayed together.

At this project on HackadaySean Hodgins created a fidget-shape PCB that fits into the spinner. It consists of an 8-LED vector, a 32-bit microcontroller, an 8-bit shift register, and other electronics parts. It is powered by three 3.6 LiPo cell batteries and can be connected with PC through a micro USB connector.

Component needed for this project:

The total cost is about $20 for all parts, and here is the bill of materials. Also the design of the fidget is available for 3D printing for both the body and the caps. In addition, the microcontroller can be programmed simply with Arduino IDE.

Since this project is fully open source, all resources and files are available for download. The github repository includes the CAD files, firmware code and libraries, PCB design, and some pictures.

Although it is a brilliant project, similar projects had been developed before and had started  funding campaigns. But unfortunately, they weren’t successful and didn’t reach their fund goal.

Finally, if you like this idea you can make it by yourself with the help of this video, which describes how to make it and how it works:

Arduino PICO, The Tiny Arduino-Compatible Board

MellBell, the Canadian-based hardware and electronics company, has launched their first product: Arduino PICO!

At first, the company says that Arduino PICO is the smallest Arduino compatible board ever, since it is 0.6″ x 0.6″ inch sized (~15mm squared). This tiny fully-fledged arduino-compatible board has a Leonardo-compatible 16MHz ATMEGA32U4 chip and a micro-USB port. The main cause of building PICO was to have a really small brain to use in many application with worrying about size or allocated space.

PICO’s Technical Specifications

The 16MHz ATMEGA32U4 integrates 2.5KB SRAM and 32KB flash, 4KB of which the bootloader uses. The 1.1-gram PICO has 8x digital I/O pins, 3x analog inputs, a PWM channel, and a reset button. In addition, the board has a 7-12V power with 5V operating voltage, where each I/O pin uses 40mA. It is worth to mention that PICO is competing with 12 x 12mm, $18 µduino, which similarly offers an Arduino Leonardo compatible ATMEGA32U4 MCU and which is smaller in size.

Moreover, MellBell provides an aluminum version that comes with the same ATMEGA32u4 core processor. With an Aluminum not regular fiber-glass, this makes PICO more reliable for overheated applications and environments.

Arduino PICO is now live on a Kickstarter campaign that two days ago had achieved its goal! Fortunately, there is still a chance until 17 Aug 2017 to pre-order one of PICO’s packages. You can get your early bird PICO for CA$18 ($14) and Aluminum edition for CA$32($25). Also, there is a special edition that includes  Aluminium PICO, four colored PICOs,  PICO joystick shield, micro drone kit, PICO solar station,  dual PICO board,  micro li-ion battery, PICO starter kit,  MiniMega board and finally a special “THANK YOU” video for CA$ 960 ($765).

Check out the campaign video:

Romeo BLE – An Arduino Based Powerful Robot Control Board With Bluetooth 4.0

Romeo BLE is an all-in-one Arduino based control board specially designed for robotics applications from DFRobot. This platform is open source and it’s powered by thousands of publicly available open-sourced codes. Romeo BLE can easily be expanded using Arduino shields. The most important feature—Bluetooth 4.0 wireless communication, allows the board to receive commands via Bluetooth. So, users can now use their smartphone, tablet, or computer to interact with the control board.

Control Robot From Smartphones by Bluetooth 4.0
Control Robot From Smartphones by Bluetooth 4.0

Even the codes can be uploaded over Bluetooth a USB Bluno Link adapter, without requiring any wired USB connection between the board and a PC. This is a great advantage for mobile applications where codes are debugged and uploaded frequently.

The Romeo BLE also includes two integrated two-channel DC motor drivers and wireless sockets, which makes project development more hassle-free. One can start the project immediately without needing an additional motor driver circuitry. The motor driving section also supports extra servos which need more current.

There are two ways to power the Romeo BLE board. But, the polarity must be correct. Otherwise, the board may get permanently damaged as there exists no reverse polarity protection. The two powering methods are:

  • Power from USB: Plug in the USB cable to the Romeo controller from a power source (i.e. wall jack or computer). If the input voltage and current are sufficient, the Romeo BLE board should turn on and a LED should light up. While powered from USB, do NOT connect anything else like motor, servo etc. except LED. Because the USB can only provide 500mA current which is certainly not enough for driving loads like motors.
  • Power from External Power Supply: Connect the ground wire from your supply to the screw terminal labeled “GND” on Romeo board, and then connect the positive wire from your supply to the screw terminal labeled “VIN”. The maximum acceptable input voltage is 23 volts. Do not exceed this value anyway.
Romeo BLE Board Pin Diagram
Romeo BLE Board Pin Diagram

Specifications:

  • Microcontroller: ATmega328P
  • Bootloader: Arduino UNO
  • Onboard BLE chip: TI CC2540
  • 14 Digital I/O ports
  • 6 PWM Outputs (Pin11, Pin10, Pin9, Pin6, Pin5, Pin3)
  • 8 10-bit analog input ports
  • 3 I2Cs
  • 5 Buttons
  • Power Supply Port: USB or DC2.1
  • External Power Supply Range: 5-23V
  • DC output: 5V/3.3V
  • Size: 94mm x 80mm

Features:

  • Auto sensing/switching external power input
  • Transmission range: 70m in free space
  • Support Bluetooth remote update the Arduino program
  • Support Bluetooth HID
  • Support iBeacons
  • Support AT command to config the BLE
  • Support Transparent communication through Serial
  • Support the master-slave machine switch
  • Support USB update BLE chip program
  • Support Male and Female Pin Header
  • Two-way H-bridge motor Driver with 2A maximum current
  • Integrated sockets for APC220 RF Module

You can program Romeo BLE using Arduino IDE version 1.8.1 or above. Select Arduino UNO from Tools –> Boards in the IDE. Go to arduino.en.cc to download the latest version of Arduino IDE. Read the Romeo BLE wiki to learn more.

Visual Studio Code Extension for Arduino is now open sourced!

Visual Studio Code is the cross-platform, open sourced advanced code editor by Microsoft.

Recently, after being interested in IoT and hardware, Microsoft is now searching for tools to make building IoT devices easier. It added an Arduino extension to its Visual Studio Code to enable a better eco-system for IoT developers using Arduino. By making some research about some challenges usually developers face, Microsoft found out that giving more access to new features and capabilities will be a pain killer for IoT enthusiasts. Later on, Microsoft had opened the source of the Arduino extension and placed it on GitHub.

 

Our Arduino extension fully embraces the Arduino developer community and is almost fully compatible and consistent with the official Arduino IDE. On top of it, we added the most sought-after features, such as IntelliSense, Auto code completion, and on-device debugging for supported boards.

Core functionalities of Arduino extension

  • IntelliSense and syntax highlighting for Arduino sketches
  • Built-in board and library manager
  • Verify and upload your sketches in Visual Studio Code
  • Built-in example list
  • Snippets for sketches
  • Built-in serial monitor
  • Automatic Arduino project scaffolding
  • Command Palette (F1) integration of frequently used commands (e.g. Verify, Upload…)
  • Integrated Arduino Debugging (New)

Of course, you can download this extension from Visual Studio Code Marketplace at: https://aka.ms/arduino.

Fortunately, Microsoft had open sourced this project on GitHub under MIT License. Thus, if you are developer, you are more than welcome to participate in developing this extension and here how you can help:

  • File a bug, submit a feature request, you can find the current bug/issue list and feature requests at GitHub’s issue tracker.
  • Join developers and users’ discussions at chat on gitter.
  • Fork the repository, fix bugs and send pull requests
  • Fork the repository, add your new cool features and send pull requests.

Finally, more detailed instructions are available at the Visual Studio Code Repo at GitHub.