Tag Archives: Atmega8

An Android Reflow controller that anyone can build

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Andy build an android reflow controller based on ATMega8L . He writes:

Welcome to the never ending saga of Andy and his reflow controllers. About a year ago I published a project writeup showing how I built a PID-based reflow controller. It featured a 640×360 graphical LCD from the Sony U5 Vivaz mobile phone and was all-surface mount. It worked well and continues to serve me well to this day but I always thought that there were improvements that I could make in several areas.

Firstly, there’s no reason why it should have been all surface-mount. The LCD in particular has a 0.4mm connector that many people will find very hard to solder by hand. After all, presumably you’re building a reflow controller to help solve that very problem. Chicken and egg.

An Android Reflow controller that anyone can build – [Link]

DIY SMD LED heart

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by Rusivan @ instructables.com:

In this article I will try to tell you about the gift I made for my girlfriend!

The basis of the scheme is a microcontroller Atmega8, 1K resistor, selected in such a way as not to overload the microcontroller ports. SMD resistors and diodes, size 1206.

On the reverse side of the board, there are two batteries CR2032, two capacitors, voltage regulator LM7805, and the power button with latching.

DIY SMD LED heart – [Link]

Driving a DC motor using PWM with AVR ATmega

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Davide Gironi writes:

The PWM frequency have to be selected in the way that the switch frequency is much higher than the dynamics of the motor.
To avoid noise from the motor, the choosen PWM frequency is 20Khz. Which is a know to know frequency.
So, with this one, you can drive up to 4 motors independently controlling:
*speed
*direction
*slow start / stop
Setup parameters are contained in dcmotorpwm.h

This library was developed on Eclipse, built with avr-gcc on Atmega8 @ 8MHz.

[via]

Driving a DC motor using PWM with AVR ATmega – [Link]

Using a USBASP v2.0 as a cheap ATmega8 Arduino platform

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JohnLittle writes:

I finally got round playing with my AVRASP v2.0 boards. The ones Sleepwalker3 mentioned. Thanks mate!
I bought three USBASP v2.0 on ebay for under £1.50 each. They each came with a short cable (5×2 sockets at each end). However, they do not come with the JP2 header soldered on. Solder it or you won’t be able to re-flash the on-board ATmega8 chip. JP3 on the other hand has been deprecated. It may still have some use in your own projects. You decide!

Then download some software (this is for Windows): To use the USBASP programmer with the Arduino IDE, you will need to download the driver, latest firmware and WinAVR-20100110-install.

Using a USBASP v2.0 as a cheap ATmega8 Arduino platform – [Link]

ATmega based pool cleaner robot

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Here’s a pool cleaner robot built on ATmega by Davide Gironi:

My replacement electronics it is based on ATmega8 micros.
The project is divided into two parts:

timer
cleaning robot

The timer contains the 220 AC to low voltage DC current, and it is out of water, his purpose is to start and stop the cleaning pool robot, which of course is inside the swimming pool.

[via]

ATmega based pool cleaner robot – [Link]

USB to Serial Converter using AVR microcontroller

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This project is a USB to Serial converter using an ATMEL AVR microcontroller. There are two version of the converter, one with SMD parts and another with TH parts. The mcu used is an ATmega8 and USB communication is done using software on AVR mcu. It’s based on the software USB implementation of AVR-CDC. Firmware can be downloaded from the download section of CDC-RS232.

USB to Serial Converter using AVR microcontroller – [Link]

A pickup winding machine built on an ATmega8

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A DIY guitar pickup winding machine built on ATmega8 by Davide Gironi:

A pickup winding machine it is used to wind a guitar pickup.
The core of this project is an ATmega8.
It features:
wind counter
slow startup
automatic stop
configurable motor speed
configurable winds
2 directions

This winder has an LCD display that will show
the current motor direction
the rotating speed of your pickup
the total and current wind counter

[via]

A pickup winding machine built on an ATmega8 – [Link]

DiY: most tiny MP3 player with ATmega8 VS1011a and Nokia6100 Display

by digitalelectronicsandprograming.blogspot.gr:

This is a complete mobile MP3 player and first mp3-player with ATmega8 and Nokia 6100 color display.

An demo firmware and gerber file for board will be available soon.

This player has capability to play wav and mp3 files and view BMP files on 8 or 24 bits/pixel from a MicroSD card with maximum capacity 2GB, the format of the SD is FAT32 with clusters from 512 Bytes to 32768Bytes, the filesystem has no limits in number of directories and files.
For future i want to adapting the SD driver for SDHC because the filesystem is designed to use all capacity of fat32 ( 2TB in 512Bytes/sector)

List of features:
Play Wav and MP3 Files because the VS1011a only this files is capable to decode( but for future in this project i want to include the VS1053 chip to play more file formats.
View Bitmap files on 8Bit and 24 bit/pixel

This project is in asm language and my 100% own libraries

DiY: most tiny MP3 player with ATmega8 VS1011a and Nokia6100 Display – [Link]

Vintage style nixie wall clock

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Andrea Biffi build a nice vertical nixie clock using ATmega8 mcu. He writes:

After the success of my first nixie clock made out from a rosewood block, I decided to lose no time and to carry on with the next one.  As some of you guys already know, or imagine, lately I’m indeed a little bit addicted to nixie-mania. I’ve bought many nixie tubes on eBay, and I experienced in electronics so to build my own high voltage power supply and then the ultimate nixie clock circuit. Digits for this clock are nice rounded and fully transparent IN-4 tubes, the same I used in the first model, but as I previously announced, I aligned them vertically, so to read from top to bottom hours, minutes, and seconds. Indeed you will see the undeniable influence of Max Pierson’s vertical clock. I guide you now through the full process to make your own unique nixie clock.

Vintage style nixie wall clock – [Link]