Tag Archives: circuit

JIGMOD Electronic Circuit Building System


Succeed with your Innovations by building reliable, high quality electronic circuits. by JIGMOD:

Most electronic components aren’t compatible with breadboards. JIGMOD bridges the gap between those components and your breadboard.
Don’t work hard – work smart! Avoid wasted time spent debugging and troubleshooting.
Be amongst the first to use this revolutionary development platform.
Develop circuits with high quality, reliable results every time
Satisfy your curiosity easily
Succeed in your innovations
Maximize your ability to test and demonstrate your circuits

JIGMOD Electronic Circuit Building System – [Link]

Overheat/Overcooling Circuit Breaker

This project automatically switches off the electrical flow in event of excess heating or excess cooling thus protecting the circuit from damage using NXP NCX2220GU. The comparator guarantees to operate at low voltages which makes this device convenient for use in 5 V systems and has a typical internal hysteresis of 9 mV that allows for greater noise immunity.

For overheat circuit breaker, reference is set to a higher value. An NPN transistor is used to drive the relay since the initial output current of the comparator is not sufficient to drive RY1. When temperature is below the reference set, the output of the comparator will be low then the transistor is in the cut off state and consequently relay does not work. When temperature goes beyond the set reference value, the output of comparator becomes high. Thus biasing the transistor Q1, activating the relay and breaking the external circuit. For overcooling circuit breaker, reference is set below the surrounding temperature and PNP transistor is used. In default state, output of comparator is high but PNP transistor works as not gate as it does not gets biased at high voltage and consequently relay does not work. When temperature becomes lower than the set value, then output of comparator becomes low thereby biasing PNP transistor. Thus activating relay and breaking external circuit.

Overheat/overcooling circuit breaker has the primary objective of cost efficiency in providing circuit protection. Unlike a fuse, which operates once and then must be replaced, a circuit breaker can be reset with no cost associated either manually or automatically to resume normal operation. Applications include isolation for all or part of the IT network switching rooms, thereby facilitating maintenance and protection for plants (transformers, generators, uninterruptible power supplies, and cables) from damage in the event of overcurrents.

Overheat/Overcooling Circuit Breaker – [Link]

Response of a 1st order RL circuit



Using Part-Sim we can verify the response of this RL circuit, and our calculations for the initial, final, and the transition between those conditions.  While analyzing this circuit’s response on paper and in Part-Sim, we must use the initial conditions (time and V) and component values.  In Part-Sim setting up the switch is the hardest part; with the simulation requiring set up of a voltage controlled switch and AC source with a pulse to get the correct behavior in the circuit.  Web based Part-Sim allows you to simulate and verify your calculations any time.

Response of a 1st order RL circuit – [Link]

Rapid Circuit Prototyping – Circuit Plotting

by Connor Archard and Feiran Chen @ cornell.edu:

Our final project was to create a rapid prototyping machine for electrical circuits by repurposing an old pen plotter that we fitted with an electrically conductive pen. Our plotter utilized an atmega 1284P to control the x and y-axis motors, and to raise and lower the pen. We created a web app that allowed a user to draw out circuits quickly, and then send them to be printed out on our plotter over a wifi network as our host computer that maintained the serial connection with the atmega 1284P. The atmega 1284P would receive vectors of x and y coordinates from the host computer that would instruct it on how to move the plotter head. By measuring the position of the plotter head on each axis through the on-chip ADC and two servo potentiometers, we were able move the plotter head to an accuracy of approximately 1/10th of an inch on a typical piece of A4 paper.

Rapid Circuit Prototyping – Circuit Plotting – [Link]


Disposable electronic circuits produced with a T-shirt printer


by Ben Coxworth @ gizmag.com:

Someday soon, your milk carton may be able to tell you that the milk has spoiled, or your bandage may indicate that it needs changing. These and other things could be made possible by a new technique developed at Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University, which allows disposable electronics to be printed on a variety of surfaces, using an existing T-shirt printer.

Disposable electronic circuits produced with a T-shirt printer – [Link]

Metastable transistor circuit


by Henrik’s Blog @ hforsten.com:

In my previous post I wrote about a circuit that would change it’s output depending on what was the spice simulations DC sweep range. Today I investigated the circuit a little and I was able to remove lots of components that didn’t affect the bug and this is the resulting circuit.

Metastable transistor circuit – [Link]

A single-supply Op-Amp circuit collection


An application note from Texas Instruments, A single-supply Op-Amp circuit collection (PDF!):

There have been many excellent collections of op-amp circuits in the past, but all of them focus exclusively on split-supply circuits. Many times, the designer who has to operate a circuit from a single supply does not know how to do the conversion.
Single-supply operation requires a little more care than split-supply circuits. The designer should read and understand this introductory material.


A single-supply Op-Amp circuit collection – [Link]

Circuit fun: Automatic audio leveling circuit


w2aew @ youtube.com writes:

This video presents a simple automatic audio volume leveling circuit. The application that prompted this is a police/fire/emergency scanner. Often times, different services will have different volumes in the receiver – so adjusting for a comfortable listening level on one service/station will often lead to other services being too loud or too quiet. This circuit will automatically adjust the volume of each received signal based on the signal’s peak amplitude. Similar circuits have been widely published, so there’s really nothing new here – just a quick tutorial and demonstration of how this circuit works. An arrangement of capacitors and diodes are used to implement a peak detector to measure the input signal amplitude. The dynamic impedance of diodes is controlled/changed to adjust the signal level. The result is a leveling circuit that has a very wide input dynamic range with a near constant average output level.

Circuit fun: Automatic audio leveling circuit – [Link]

Novel process allows production of the entire circuitry on touchscreens in one step


by INM – Leibniz-Institut für Neue Materialien:

When users operate their smartphones, tablets and so on, they do not give a second thought to the complicated electronics that make them work. All that concerns them is that they can happily swipe and tap away. To make the touchscreens work, they are provided on their surface with microscopically small electrical conductor tracks, which open and close circuits when touched with a finger. At the peripheries of the devices, these microscopic tracks merge into larger conductor tracks. Until now, several production stages have been needed to create them. The researchers at the INM – Leibniz-Institute for New Materials are now presenting a novel process that allows microscopic and macroscopic conductor tracks to be produced in one step.

Novel process allows production of the entire circuitry on touchscreens in one step – [Link]

EveryCircuit – Interactive visual circuit simulation web app

EveryCircuit helps electronics enthusiasts to quickly prototype circuits and share their designs. Students find it useful because of real-time interactive simulation and visualization of circuit operation. EC was first released as an Android app (over 1M users). Thanks to Google’s new Portable Native Client technology that lets us run C++ code at full speed in Chrome browser, it is now available online.

EveryCircuit is a web and mobile app for EE students and circuit enthusiasts. Its interactive visual circuit simulation is great for understanding how circuits work and for quick prototyping of design ideas. And it has a huge online repository of educational and practical circuits designed by EveryCircuit community.

EveryCircuit – Interactive visual circuit simulation web app – [Link]