Tag Archives: radar

Acconeer’s A111 – Pulsed Coherent Radar

Acconeer’s A111 radar sensor is based on a unique patented technology enabling mm accuracy with very low power consumption.

The Acconeer A111 is a low power, high precision 60 GHz pulsed SRD radar sensor with a footprint of 29 mm2, delivered in one chip system in package (SiP) solution with embedded RF and antenna. The small size and the low power consumption makes it suitable for integration into any mobile or portable battery driven device.

The A111 radar sensor is based on a unique patented technology enabling mm accuracy with very low power consumption. The 60 GHz unlicensed ISM band provides robustness not compromised by any natural source of interference such as noise, dust, color, direct or indirect light, and easy integration with no need of an aperture. The A111 radar sensor detects multiple objects at close range with single measurements as well as continuous sweeps set to any frequency rate up to 1500 Hz. Additionally, the unique characteristics of the radar sensor enables material recognition and motion detection for advanced sensing applications.

Features

  • mm Accuracy – distance mm accuracy for one or multiple objects
  • Movement and speed measurement – continuous measurements up to 1500 Hz
  • Material identification – distinguish between materials with different di-electric constant
  • Microwatt – enables integration into any battery driven device
  • Optimized integration – small one chip solution with embedded RF and antenna solution that requires no need for aperture
  • Robustness – not compromised by any natural source of interference such as noise, dust, color, direct or indirect light

Applications

  • Range measurements with high accuracy
  • Configurable measuring update frequency, up to 1500 Hz
  • Material identification. Possible to distinguish between different materials
  • Movement, speed measurement and object tracking e.g. gesture control, vital signs
  • Radar assisted camera for high performing lateral measurement i.e. Depth mapping, computational photography, assisted AF
  • Proximity sensing with high accuracy. Possibility to define multiple proximity zones
  • Radar assisted biometrics for enhanced security e.g. face recognition, human fingerprint recognition

SocioNext MN87900 is a Single-Chip 24 GHz Radio Wave Sensor for the Internet of Things

The Socionext MN87900 from Socionext is a powerful and low-power single-chip microwave sensor at 24GHz with sophisticated sensing capabilities like motion detection, speed and direction detection and so many, that can quickly find applications in the Internet of Things sensing applications.

Socionext MN87900

Unlike PIR sensors like the popular HR-SR501 that can detect motion to about 3 meters at about 120 angles and based on the concept of detecting infrared energy emitted by an object while attempting to determine if it’s a motion or not, the Socionext MN87900 is a microwave sensor that sends out microwave signals and detects the bounce back signals to decide if it’s a motion or not. Microwave sensor uses what we call the Doppler’s Effect concept.

SocioNext MN87900 is a 24 GHz and very tiny, measures about 12mm x 7mm x 1mm making it ideal for the small size requirement in the most Internet of Things application and other applications in the areas of smart-home, automotive or driver assistance systems, medical applications, and many more. Based on a single-chip radio frequency IC (RFIC) that offers a multi-mode sensing capability for detecting stationary or moving objects and measuring the distance and direction of movement, including whether an object is approaching or leaving. This multi-mode sensor capability gives the device ability to re-adapt its functionality to different case scenario without making any single hardware changes.

The RFIC can be used to sense very slow movements (like breathing and heartbeats), and even detect the movement of multiple objects within a 160-degree radius to a distance of about 8 meters away. With slight modification, the RFIC can reach a range of up to 30 meters.

Apart from having powerful sensing capabilities, it is also power friendly. During continuous operation, the sensor can take up to 500mW, but this can be reduced to an intermittent operation where for example, during a one-sixth burst, the sensor can take about 80mW, a very drastic reduction in power. The MN87900 can pass through fabric or resin like materials, and unlike camera-based people detecting applications, the MN87900 doesn’t need to capture or display images to identify people or objects which is handy for privacy-concerned applications.

The MN87900 supports SPI as a form of interface to microcontroller system. Along with the hardware, a simple API system was developed to support the designs of CW, FSKCW, and FMCW mode capabilities to provide distance, direction, and relative velocity.

The following are the SocioNext MN87900 key specifications:

  • Sensing Modes – CW, FSKCW, FMCW (moving or stationary)
  • Detection
    • Motion direction – approaching or leaving
    • Motion speed – up to 200 km/h
    • Range – 0.15 to 8 meters 80°@-3dB, expandable to 30 meters
  • Variable frequency width –  24.15±0.1 GHz
  • Host Interface – SPI
  • High sensitivity – -110dBm
  • Transmission Power: 0.8mW
  • Fast frequency pull-in: 100 µs
  • Automatic adjustment: Built-in initial adjustment function (e.g. adjustment of RC filtering)
  • Power supply voltage: 2.5V
  • Current consumption: 200mA
  • Module size: 12mm x 7mm x 1mm
  • Weight – 145 mg
  • Temperature Range – -40°C to 85°C

The module pricing is currently not available, and more information about the product can be found here.

RadarBox24.com – Live Flight Tracker and Flight Status

AirNav Systems develops flight tracking software able to live track flights from around the globe. The solutions are developed by real aviation professionals (airline pilots, engineers and air traffic controllers) -and RadarBox24 was developed on a real world aviation environment. ADS-B receivers used are AirNav RadarBox Pro and AirNav RadarBox 3D. Every RadarBox receiver is designed to share real-time flight data to AirNav Systems servers. Data comes from thousands receivers from all over the world and is processed (at an amazing rate of over 20 million messages per day). Finally data is provided in web browsers and mobile solutions.

Now you can build your own Raspberry Pi data feeder using RBFeeder client and sent data to Radarbox24. This short article will explain everything you need to know about our new Linux based client and how you can install it on your Raspberry Pi.

Homemade 6 GHz FMCW radar

Henrik Forstén has a nice build log on his newest version of this homemade 6 GHz FMCW radar:

Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar works by transmitting a chirp which frequency changes linearly with time. This chirp is then radiated with the antenna, reflected from the target and is received by the receiving antenna. On the reception side the received signal that was delayed and undelayed copy of the transmitted chirp are mixed (multiplied) together.

Homemade 6 GHz FMCW radar – [Link]

122 GHz On-chip Radar

Silicon technology has made tremendous progress towards ever higher device cut-off frequencies. Nowadays all RF components for mm-Wave sensing applications up to 120 GHz can be realized.
Silicon Radar is a german company that designs and delivers Millimetre Wave Integrated Circuits (MMICs) on a technologically advanced level, manufactured in affordable Silicon-Germanium-Technology (SiGe). It has just introduced new development kits using GHz CMOS radar MMICs, which are built using SiGe or SiGe:C from IHP.

Silicon Radar participated in the European Commission 7th Framework Success project,  to develop ways to mass produce silicon mm-Wave SoCs at low cost – with STMicro, IHP, Evatronix, Selmic, Hightec, Bosch, the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the University of Toronto.

20161017130553_silicon-radar

The development kits are:

assy_easyradarkit_270EasyRadar is for evaluating all of the firm’s TX/RX radar chips, and is “great for beginners and pros who want to start development and tweak system parameters”, said Silicon Radar.

EasyRadar features:

  • programmable FMCW parameters
  • signal processing
  • target recognition
  • web-based GUI
  • USB or wireless LAN communication with PC

The kit includes:

  • 122 GHz radar front end (see photo above)
  • 24 GHz radar front end (see lower photo)
  • controller board
  • baseband board with WiFi
  • lens for 122 GHz

You can download the user guide and the protocol description

simpleradar_270SimpleRadar is available to evaluate the firm’s 122 GHz radar front end.

It has the same functionality as the EasyRadar but is smaller (40 x 40mm), and can be used as a Wi-Fi-enabled radar sensor with integrated target recognition.

It has the following features:

  • programmable FMCW parameters
  • signal processing
  • target recognition
  • web-based GUI
  • USB communication with PC or over wireless LAN

You can check its user guide and the protocol description

“We offer high frequency circuits for radar solutions, phased-array-systems and wireless communications, for both custom specific ASIC design and supply of standard circuits in frequency range from 10GHz X-band up to 200GHz and above,” said the firm.

Possible applications using the kits are:

  • distance sensing applications such as industrial sensing (distance, speed, material characterisation),
  • public and private safety (motion detectors, even behind wall paper),
  • automotive (wheel suspension measurement, pedestrian safety),
  • replacement of cheap ultrasonic sensors (distance measurement)

For more details, you can download the full package. Since it is password-protected, you have to contact the company to gain access.

Arduino Radar Tutorial: Fading an LED With My Breath

arduino-radar-breadboard-1-768x1024

by build-electronic-circuits.com:

I built this Arduino radar project, where I control the brightness of an LED with my breath. In this tutorial, I will show you exactly how to do it.

It was an experiment to get the XeThru radar to work with Arduino. I plan to expand on this later, and build more useful applications.

And I will share with you how to connect the hardware, and how to create the Arduino code.

Arduino Radar Tutorial: Fading an LED With My Breath – [Link]