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13 Dec 2014

DC-Motor-Control_top-view_plain

by elektor.com:

Infineon have announced two shields for the Arduino development environment. The RGB LED Lighting Shield (shown left) provides three independent output channels with a DC/DC LED driver stage to give flicker-free control of multicolor LEDs. It is fitted with an XMC1202 microcontroller using a Brightness Color Control Unit (BCCU) to help off-load time-critical events from the Arduino processor. The Shield can be expanded by adding an optional isolated DMX512 interface for stage lighting control and audio nodes or a 24 GHz radar sensor for motion detection.

Arduino Shields from Infineon - [Link]

13 Dec 2014

DS1307_RTC_module

John Boxall over at Tronixstuff has posted a detailed tutorial on how to on how to use DS1307 and DS3231 real-time clock modules with Arduino:

There are two main differences between the ICs on the real-time clock modules, which is the accuracy of the time-keeping. The DS1307 used in the first module works very well, however the external temperature can affect the frequency of the oscillator circuit which drives the DS1307’s internal counter.
This may sound like a problem, however will usually result with the clock being off by around five or so minutes per month. The DS3231 is much more accurate, as it has an internal oscillator which isn’t affected by external factors – and thus is accurate down to a few minutes per year at the most. If you have a DS1307 module- don’t feel bad, it’s still a great value board and will serve you well.

[via]

Using DS1307 and DS3231 real-time clock modules with Arduino - [Link]

13 Dec 2014

Dave reviews the Analog Discovery 14bit 100MS/s USB oscilloscope and multi-function instrument from Digilent.

It has a 2-Channel Oscilloscope
2-Channel Waveform Generator
16-Channel Logic Analyzer
16-Channel Digital Pattern Generator
±5VDC Power Supplies
Spectrum Analyzer
Network Analyzer with Bode, Nichols and Nyquist plots.

EEVblog #692 – Digilent Analog Discovery Review - [Link]

13 Dec 2014

by w2aew @ youtube.com:

This video shows a simple circuit that can be used to control the position of an typical remote control (RC) style servo with an analog voltage. The PWM (pulse width modulated) control signal format for an RC servo is reviewed, followed by the presentation of a simple circuit that can be used to control the servo with a simple adjustable DC voltage. The circuit is built with rail-to-rail op amps and a few resistors and capacitors. Note that the schematic presented doesn’t include all of the decoupling on the power supply and reference lines that you would likely want to include. A description of the circuit, as well as a more in depth discussion of each of the building blocks such as an integrator, hysteresis comparator and DC signal conditioner circuit including an attenuator, inverting amplifier and level shifter, is presented.

Circuit Fun: Control an RC Servo with an adjustable DC voltage - [Link]


12 Dec 2014

The MAX5825PMB1 peripheral module provides the necessary hardware to interface the MAX5825 8-channel DAC to any system that utilizes Pmod™-compatible expansion ports configurable for I²C communication. The IC features eight independent 12-bit accurate internally buffered voltage-output DAC channels. The IC also features an internal reference that is selectable between 2.048V, 2.500V, and 4.096V (4.096V reference operation is not supported with a standard 3.3V Pmod-port power supply).

MAX5825PMB1 Peripheral Module Board - [Link]

 

12 Dec 2014

LM3886(1)_th

This is my second encounter with LM3886. I was pleased of the sound this chip produced the first time, so I decided to make another amplifier with it. The schematic is based on the schematic in the datasheet of the chip with minor changes.

I removed the time delay capacitor connected to MUTE pin, because it’s better to use separate DC protection schematic which has similar functionality. I made the output inductance L1 by winding 15 turns of enameled wire around the resistor R7. The diameter of the wire must be minimum 0.4mm. The whole was wrapped with heat shrink. I used 47uF/63V non polarized capacitor for C2. It can be regular electrolytic capacitor, but it’s better to use non-polarized or bipolar.

50W Power Amplifier with LM3886 - [Link]

12 Dec 2014

electronic-skin-senses-touch-direction-1

by Richard Moss @ gizmag.com:

We’ve already seen artificial skin capable of sensing touch and prosthetics that sense texture, but now a group of Korean scientists has come up with a stretchable electronic skin that “feels” in three dimensions. The artificial skin is made from arrays of microscopic domes that interlock and deform when pressed. It can detect the intensity, location, and direction of pressure, whether from an object or a mere gust of wind.

Electronic skin can sense the direction in which it’s being touched - [Link]

12 Dec 2014

by TheSignalPathBlog @ youtube:

In this episode Shahriar compares the performance and features of the Siglent SDG5162 and Rigol DG4162 Arbitrary Waveform Generators. Siglent has recently opened a new North America office which would certainly help them bring their instruments to the US more quickly and provide better local customer and sale support.

The Siglent SDG5000 teardown is presented. Aside from various GUI features of these two units, the THD, phase noise and maximum output power of each unit is measured. The ability of the Siglent generator to produce 12ns pulse width independent of the output frequency is also presented with some practical applications. Finally the Easy Wave application us is used to generate some custom waveforms.

Review, Comparison and Teardown of Siglent SDG5162 and Rigol DG4162 Arbitrary Waveform Generator - [Link]

12 Dec 2014

article-2014december-protect-your-mcu-design-fig3

by Warren Miller @ digikey.com:

MCUs are used as the main control element in just about every application imaginable. Their power and flexibility make them the go-to component at the heart of most designs. Since it is important to make sure that your design cannot be easily copied, reverse engineered or tampered with, modern MCUs now provide a few different options for protecting your design; a good understanding of the capabilities and trade-offs are important in order to determine which approach is best for a given design.

This article will review some of the common approaches to design protection, such as making your MCU unreadable from the outside world, using on-chip capabilities to validate that the code to be executed is unmodified, and using external components to provide more advanced security capabilities. On-board techniques for tamper detection and possible “penalties” that can be applied also will be described.

Protect Your MCU Design from Copying and Reverse Engineering - [Link]

12 Dec 2014

Front2009

by Jim @ jimlaurwilliams.org:

I got a couple of cheap ($1.29) 1A USB LiPo chargers since I’m doing more and more LiPo/LiIon powered stuff. I mostly discharged a recycled 18650 cell for a test load and it looks like it does charge at nearly 1A. Two LEDs – red charging, green (mine is blue) fully charged. Seems like a pretty ideal cheap device.

Cheap USB LiPo charger notes - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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