PCB category

The Factors That Determine PCB Assembly Pricing

This is a sponsored post discussing about PCB assembly costs factors on Bittele Electronics.

Bittele Electronics has developed its pricing schedule based on various factors that determine PCB assembly costs. Some of our customers call us to better understand the factors involved assembly pricing. In general, the factors that cause pricing differences include PCB dimensions, part types and quantities, soldering methodology, type of inspections, etc.

Pricing changes often depend upon the quantity of parts to be assembled on a PCB as well as the type of parts. Component types and the technology selected by the customer also determine our final pricing. Other things that impact pricing include, through-hole components, SMDs, and fine pitch, leadless or BGA devices.

There are substantial price increases if you specify double-sided assembly. This is because the assembly process will need to be repeated to place parts on both sides of the board. The double-sided assembly process also includes extra solder stencil production, SMT equipment programming, etc., which can add costs to the average assembly charge. Nonetheless, Bittele attempts to charge reasonable prices along with lead-free assembly by considering all these factors in our prices.

Bittele offers lead-free assembly based upon the customer’s specifications. We possess two additional production lines dedicated to lead-free assembly. We employ RoHS-compliant, state-of-the-art soldering methods. Lead-free assembly may result in prices changes, however. You can obtain the actual costs by contacting one of our sales representatives.

The type and size of parts that you select will also determine the final PCB assembly cost. Charges may also change if you specify lead-less parts, such as BGA, QFN, etc. In addition, costs may vary with package sizes (e.g., 0201, 1206, etc.) as well as the inspection methods you specify.

Bittele has a variety of inspection methods, including in-circuit and functional tests, available to ensure high quality PCBs. We are capable of the following tests: visual inspection for basic quality verifications, x-ray testing for lead-less devices and blank PCBs, AOI inspections to test solder paste applications, missing components, and polarity. Our inspections are completed without additional charges.

PcbDraw – KiCAD board into a nice looking 2D drawing

Convert your KiCAD boards into nice looking 2D drawings suitable for pinout diagrams. Never draw them manually again! [via]

Jan Mrázek created a Python script that takes a KiCAD board (.kicad_pcb file) and produces a 2D nice looking drawing of the board as an SVG file.

This small Python script takes a KiCAD board (.kicad_pcb file) and produces a 2D nice looking drawing of the board as an SVG file. This allows you to quickly and automatically create awesome pinout diagrams for your project. These diagrams are much easier to read than a labeled photo of a physical board or an actual KiCAD design.

PcbDraw – KiCAD board into a nice looking 2D drawing – [Link]

SnapEDA launches InstaBuild, helping PCB designers build free parts in minutes

SAN FRANCISCO  – September 28, 2017 – Today, SnapEDA – the Internet’s first parts library for circuit board design – is launching InstaBuild, the first free automated part builder.

InstaBuild uses powerful computer vision technology to enable PCB designers to make schematic symbols in mere minutes.

Using a datasheet as the input, it automatically extracts symbol pinouts, understands whether a pin is an input, output or power pin, and auto-arranges the symbols based on SnapEDA’s published symbol standards.

“InstaBuild is based on the underlying technology we use internally at SnapEDA to create parts quickly,” said Natasha Baker, CEO & Founder of SnapEDA.  “We’re opening up access so that hardware designers around the world can benefit from this technology.”

The symbols are automatically mapped to verified IPC-compliant footprints. The designer can then download the ready-to-use symbol and footprint for their desired PCB design software.

Supported formats include Altium, Autodesk Eagle, Mentor PADS & DXDesigner, Cadence OrCad and Allegro, KiCad, and PCB123. For most parts, the process takes less than 5 minutes.

If a part is already available in SnapEDA’s vast component library, then the part can simply be downloaded free from the SnapEDA website instantly, or from within Altium, Eagle, or PCB123 using one of the SnapEDA plugins.

InstaBuild is free, and can be accessed from supported part pages on SnapEDA. To learn more visit www.snapeda.com/instabuild.

Digi-Key Releases New Addition of Symbols & Footprints for Vishay Products

New models, available via SnapEDA, streamline the design-in of Vishay optoelectronics parts.

THIEF RIVER FALLS, Minnesota, SANTA CLARA, California, and SAN FRANCISCO, California, USA – Digi-Key Electronics, a global electronic components distributor, today announced the addition of symbols, footprints, and 3D models for Vishay’s catalog of optoelectronics products.

The models, made available via online parts library SnapEDA, can be downloaded for free for most major PCB design tools.

Designers spend days creating digital models for each component in their circuit board designs. With this new collaboration, designers can simply drag-and-drop high-quality, auto-verified models into their designs, saving them days of time.

“Each day, thousands of designers use Digi-Key to find components for their designs,” said Natasha Baker, CEO & Founder of SnapEDA. “By adding SnapEDA’s high-quality, ready-to-use digital models to the content solutions available, we’re helping them move from idea to production faster than ever with Vishay products.”

Products supported with this release include a wide variety of Vishay’s optical sensors, optocouplers, solid-state relays, and MOSFET drivers.

New parts library for Mentor PADS & DX Designer accelerates PCB design

Designers can build circuit boards faster with millions of symbols & footprints on SnapEDA.

July 18, 2017 –  SAN FRANCISCO –  Mentor, a Siemens business, and SnapEDA, the Internet’s first parts library for circuit board design, are announcing new support for Mentor PADS® and DX Designer on SnapEDA.

Whether building satellites or medical devices, hardware designers spend days creating digital models for each component on their circuit boards, a painful and time-consuming process that hinders product development.

With today’s launch, Mentor PADS & DX Designer customers will gain access to SnapEDA’s extensive component library containing millions of symbols, footprints, and 3D models, further enhancing the vast resources available for Mentor PCB design software.

All parts are auto-verified with SnapEDA’s proprietary verification technology, helping to reduce risk and unneeded, costly prototype iterations. This technology answers common questions designers have about libraries, such as “what standards does this footprint conform to?”

As the world becomes more connected, electronic devices are proliferating and diversifying, and time-to-market is more crucial than ever for companies to stay competitive.

How to Route Differential Pairs

Sam Sattel @ autodesk.com discuss about the benefits of differential signals and how to route them in Eagle.

If you’re designing a high speed PCB, then chances are you’re working with the latest and most powerful technologies, like HDMI, USB3.0, Ethernet, or DDR. But with great power comes great responsibility! As a result, you’ll likely be dealing with issues like electromagnetic interference (EMI) and noise.

So what do you do about these problems? When you’ve got a bunch of noisy signals on your board and you need a way to protect the transmission of your data then you need to be using differential pairs. In this blog we’ll be looking at all of the great benefits for using differential pairs in your high speed design project, and how to route them in Autodesk EAGLE.

How to Route Differential Pairs – [Link]

Fiducial Marks in PCBs – What they are?

In the past, I’ve  always seen small circuits of copper with no silk screen or solder mask on top of it and as a PCB designer I have always the question in my mind: What is it for? — I’ve never needed them before!

As I can find them in Arduino’s PCBs as well, I decided to open the design file and investigate more about these marks. They are called: Fiducial marks.

Fiducial Mark in Arduino UNO PCB. Original Image Courtesy of reichelt

Fiducial Mark is a circuit solder mask with a round bare copper in the center. The copper diameter is smaller than the solder mask. As the name may imply; these marks are used by assembling machines as points of reference, and they should be placed in any PCB side that has SMD components.

No restrict rule about  how many or where theses marks should be placed. But according to the reference, it’s good to position two fiducial marks on opposite corners of the PCB, and it’s advisable to put a mark near the packages with small pitch like BGA, QFN and QFP.

Image Courtesy of pcb-3d

When it comes to size of fiducial marks, it depends on the used assembly machine. The mark dimensions could be 3.2mm of solder mask opening diameter and 1.6mm diameter of bare copper or 2mm of solder mask opening diameter and 1mm diameter of bare copper.

Image Courtesy of Ladyada

I found a video on Youtube showing how Fiducial Marks are recognized in a PnP (Pick and Place) machine.

Also, I found that Ladyada made a short blog post on the problems you may face using Fiducial Marks recognition in PnPs.

PCB Design for manufacture [PDF]

SeeedStudio has published a PCB design manual to help makers and engineers design better PCBs. The guide covers many aspects of PCB design for manufacture summarizing the experience of their PCB service over the last 9 years.

PCB Design for manufacture – [Link]

Printed Two-Dimensional Transistors

Researchers from AMBER (Advanced Materials and BioEngineering Research) and Trinity College (Dublin), together with the TU Delft have succeeded in producing printed transistors, which are made solely from two-dimensional nano materials. These materials have characteristics with much promise and, importantly, can also be produced very cheaply. Possible applications for this procedure are food packaging with a digital countdown timer for the use-by date, wine labels which will show when the contents is at the optimal drinking temperature, security for bank notes and perhaps even flexible solar cells.

The researchers, under the leadership of professors Jonathan Coleman and Georg Duesberg, have used standard printing techniques to combine nano sheets of graphene, which are used as electrodes, with two other nano materials (tungsten diselenide and boron nitride) that function as channel and separator. The result is functional transistor made from nano sheets using only printing technology.


Two-dimensional transistors, as such, are not new – they have already been manufactured using a chemical deposition from the vapor phase. A significant disadvantage of this and other existing methods is their high cost. In comparison, printed electronics is based around printable molecules formed from carbon compounds, which can easily and cheaply be turned into a usable ink.

The material of the printed electronics comprises a large number of nano sheets of different sizes (which are sometimes also called ‘flakes’). During the printing process these are layered in a random pattern. The consequence of this is that the printed material is somewhat unstable and the performance has some limitations.

The transistors printed this way are a first important step towards printed 2D-structures made from a single nano sheet. This would dramatically improve the performance of printed electronics. This is the subject of current research at the TU Delft.

Jonathan Coleman from Trinity College is a partner of Graphene flagship, an EU initiative that in the next 10 years has to stimulate new technologies and innovation.

Source: Elektor