Tag Archives: MSP430

Ultra-low-power MSP430 microcontrollers

Developers can implement simple sensing functions with TI’s lowest-cost microcontroller family

Texas Instruments (TI) on November 10, unveiled its lowest-cost ultra-low-power MSP430 microcontrollers (MCUs) for sensing applications. Developers can now implement simple sensing solutions through a variety of integrated mixed-signal features in this family of MSP430 value line sensing MCUs, available for as low as US$0.25 in high volumes. Additions to the family include two new entry-level devices and a new TI LaunchPad development kit for quick and easy evaluation.

Features and benefits of TI’s MSP430 value line sensing MCUs

  • Developers now have the flexibility to customize 25 common system-level functions including timers, input/output expanders, system reset controllers, electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) and more, using a library of code examples.
  • A common core architecture, a tools and software ecosystem, and extensive documentation including migration guides make it easy for developers to choose the best MSP430 value line sensing MCU for each of their designs.
  • Designers can scale from the 0.5-KB MSP430FR2000 MCU to the rest of the MSP430 sensing and measurement MCU portfolio for applications that require up to 256 KB of memory, higher performance or more analog peripherals.

The new MSP430FR2000 and MSP430FR2100 MCUs (with 0.5 KB and 1 KB of memory, respectively) and the new development kit join the MSP430 value line sensing family which includes the MSP430FR2111, MSP430FR2311, MSP430FR2033, MSP430FR2433 and MSP430FR4133 microcontroller families and their related development tools and software.

Pricing and availability

Developers can purchase the value line sensing portfolio through the TI store, priced as low as US$0.29 in 1,000-unit quantities and US$0.25 in higher volumes. Additionally, the new MSP430FR2433 LaunchPad development kit (MSP-EXP430FR2433) is available from the TI store and authorized distributors for US$9.99. Today through Dec. 31, 2017, the TI store is offering the LaunchPad kit for a promotional price of US$4.30.

For more information visit: www.ti.com/ValueLine-pr

Magic Mote MSP430G2553 wireless sensor node with NRF24L01+ module

Tom from Magic Smoke writes:

This is my first time designing a PCB for MSP430. I really like the NRF24L01+ booster pack but I would like something smaller to use for remote temperature sensors. With that in mind I’ve designed a 24.5 x 50 mm PCB (2 on a 5×5 cm prototype) featuring MSP430G2553 and an adapter for a 8-pin NRF24L01+ module using essentially the same pinout, with the intention of using the Spirilis library. There’s a jack socket to connect a 1-wire sensor (e.g. DS18B20), a 4-pin header to connect a temperature/humidity sensor (SHT22 or similar), a programming header that gives serial access, and 3 other general purpose I/O pins.

Magic Mote MSP430G2553 wireless sensor node with NRF24L01+ module – [Link]

An Introduction to MSP430 Launchpad

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Rahul Sreedharan introduces us to TI’s MSP430 microcontroller using LaunchPad board.

In this tutorial we will be exploring the workings of a MSP430 based microcontroller from Texas Instruments. MSP430 is developed by Texas Instruments as an extremely low power 16 bit architecture for use in low power, low cost, energy constrained embedded applicationsThe Hardware used is the MSP430 Launchpad from TI which contains a programmer/Debugger + two microcontrollers making it an ideal platform to start learning about MSP430G2xxx controller.

An Introduction to MSP430 Launchpad – [Link]

Building a “$5 Forth computer”

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Ken Boak has designed a tiny 16-bit computer around a FRAM based MSP430 microcontroller. He writes:

In this post we look at a new MSP430 FRAM based device – the MSP430FR2433. It has 15K of FRAM, 0.5K of Info FRAM and 4K bytes of SRAM. As well as the memory, there are 3 serial communications interfaces, a multichannel 10 bit ADC and 3 timers. All of this in a tiny low cost package – which makes an almost perfect Forth Computer.
The MSP430FR2433 from Texas Instruments costs about $1.36 in volume – and $2.58 in 1 off.
With a little creative design, low cost parts and a tiny 2 layer pcb we are en-route to offering a Forth Computer which could cost as little as $5 when produced in volume.

Building a “$5 Forth computer” – [Link]

MSP430 VFD Clock

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Daniel Johnson @ danielelectronics.com has build a VFD Tube Clock based on MSP430 microcontroller and explains it’s code.

I wanted to do a follow-up to my last clock build, the MSP430 Analog Gauge Clock, reusing some of the code from that project, and I had an IV-18 vacuum florescent display (VFD) tube that I bought on Ebay. Also, I wanted to finish the project before Christmas break was over. That didn’t happen. But I did manage to get the code written and most of the hardware built.

MSP430 VFD Clock – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

Contactless Infrared Thermometer (Pyrometer) using MLX90614 and MSP430

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mcs.uwsuper.edu has build a contactless thermometer based on MLX90614 sensor and MSP430 mcu.

The device is designed for contactless measuring and monitoring temperature of objects. It is built on Melexis MLX90614 sensor and can measure temperatures in the range from -70°C to +380°C with 0.5°C accuracy and 0.01°C resolution. The period of measurements can be set in the menu from 1 sec to 1 min in 10 sec increments. It is also possible to record the temp measurements and upload them to a computer via the serial interface through X1 and an external level converter.

Contactless Infrared Thermometer (Pyrometer) using MLX90614 and MSP430 – [Link]

LCD clock with 4″ display

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mcs.uwsuper.edu has build a big LCD clock based on MSP430 mcu and DS3231 RTC clock chip. They write:

The clock is built on a 4″ (101 mm) LCD displays OD-103 manufactured by Orient Display. The LCD provides high contrast of digits and easy reading from a large distance. The unit runs on batteries and can also be powered from mains. Here is how it looks under direct sun.

The time keeping is provided by DS3231 RTC chip with an integrated high accuracy (± 5ppm) MEMS crystal. This makes PCB design very simple, as one does not need to take care on special traces design around the crystal.

LCD clock with 4″ display – [Link]

Open Badge: The LED Badge

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Rohit Gupta published a new build, the OpenBadge

The major elements on the PCB were:
– LED Matrix
– A MSP430G2553 microcontroller brain
– A ULN2803 Darlington Driver to sink the current
– A USB connector to charge the battery
– A SBW connector to program the MSP430
– A Switch to change the message
– A Li-Ion battery from a Discarded Phone
– Current limiting and Pull up resistors
– Decoupling Capacitors
– A REG1117 Regulator for MSP430

Open Badge: The LED Badge – [Link]