Atmega8 Development Board

ATMEGA8L

Atmega8 Development Board provides a very simple and cost effective platform for prototyping solution.  The compact design provides connection to all the pins of the microcontroller for the user.

  • Prototyping solution available for 28-pin ATmega series AVR microcontroller from ATMEL
  • All the three ports available to the user via standard 10 pin box header with supply of 5 VDC for interfacing circuits
  • Onboard reset switch for easy reset of the microcontroller
  • ISP (In circuit Serial Programming) connector available for chips with ISP support
  • 8 MHz crystal on board
  • UART level shifter circuit using MAX232 IC, on board for easy connection of the board to the RS232 devices

Atmega8 Development Board – [Link]

A Xively AMbient QUality MOnitor built on ATmega328

avr_atmega_ambient_quality_monitor-humidity-temperature-noise-light

Davide Gironi has build an indoor ambient quality monitor that is able to measure temperature, humidity, noise and brightness and indicate the ambient quality using 4 bi-color LEDs. He writes:

The data it is logged to the xively.com platform, and displayed to the user through 4 bi-color leds.

It can be used to monitor you Office Ambient Quality over the parameters logged.

This project it is built upon the xively logger ATmega328 library: http://davidegironi.blogspot.it/2014/12/a-web-configurable-xively-logger-build.htmlhttp://davidegironi.blogspot.it/2014/12/a-web-configurable-xively-logger-build.html

A Xively AMbient QUality MOnitor built on ATmega328 – [Link]

DIY Weather Station with Bluetooth

FAYKGH0IE1HJEYC.MEDIUM

by Matej Blagšič @ instructables.com:

Recently I attended a course in our University of Electrical Engineering and we were making ourselves a small weather station. It included learning about soldering, sensors and arduino. It was super fun making it with little kids and other high school kids my age. I will show you how you can build it yourself, what components do you need and explain you the code and how can you upgrade it with more sensors.

DIY Weather Station with Bluetooth – [Link]

Generation of Sound Using Microcontroller

This project illustrates the use of a microcontroller(MCU) to generate different types of sound. The device uses SST89E54RDA-40-C-PIEMCU, an 8-bit 8051-compatible MCU with embedded SuperFlash memory.The device comes with 24/40KByte of on-chip flash EEPROM program memory which is partitioned into two independent program memory blocks. The primary block 0 occupies 16/32KByte of internal program memory space while the secondary block 1 occupies 8KByte of internal program memory space.

Sound is a function of frequency. This concept has been used to generate sound from the microcontroller. Varying the frequency can produce different types of sounds especially with the use of timer 1 of the MCU to produce different frequencies. Timer is used to produce exact delays and by toggling the output pin, it will generate the desired frequencies. These frequencies are then fed to pin 0 of port 1 which is connected to the speaker. By combining frequencies of different values, different tones will be produced.

The circuit is a basic sound generator that has wide applications such as used in cars that produce sound while reversing. In addition, it supports electronic piano to generate different tones, or in electronic toys to generate sounds. Thus, this device is an effective sound generator that produces an audible sound as preferred by the user.

Generation of Sound Using Microcontroller – [Link]

Orange Pi undercuts Raspberry Pi

20150901022403_Opi

by Martin Cooke @ elektormagazine.com:

Over the last few months the Asian manufacturer Shenzhen Xunlong Software has released a number of capable open-spec single board computers with the ‘Orange Pi’ label that are both Linux and Android-ready. Their latest offering is the Orange Pi PC which packs an Allwinner (Cortex-A7) quad-core H3 SoC running at 1.6 GHz, priced at just $15. That’s less than half the price of the latest Raspberry Pi board which uses the Broadcom processor based around the same quad cores but running at 900 MHz.

Orange Pi undercuts Raspberry Pi – [Link]

VHF-UHF RF Sniffer

F1YYZNLIE1HLISE.MEDIUM

by simpletronic @ instructables.com

This is a multi-chapter instructable. I will be describing the making of a short/medium range RF remote-control using the UHF 433Mhz frequency. It´s impossible to setup & adjust a RF transmit-receive link if you are not sure the transmitter is working properly.At 433MHz, your multimeter or even a regular oscilloscope are totally useless.

VHF-UHF RF Sniffer – [Link]

SiC/GaN Poised for Power

rcj_Yole_Power_Trasistors_SiC_GaN_1

by R. Colin Johnson @ eetimes.com:

PORTLAND, Ore.—Today Yole Development predicted that power transistors would radically shift from silicon wafers to silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) substrates—to achieve higher power in smaller spaces, according to its GaN and SiC Devices for Power Electronics Applications report.

One of the big drivers behind the shift is the electric vehicle (EV) and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) industries, which Yole predicts will be majorly pushing the SiC technology to minimize the size of the power electronics using them.

SiC/GaN Poised for Power – [Link]

Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino, Part 3

Original-2-Signals-AnalysIR-600x338

The crew from AnalysIR has written up an article on Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino. If you missed part 1 and part 2, be sure to check it out.:

In Part 1 of this series, we demonstrated how to send signals using soft or Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino. In our Part 2 post we looked at sending RAW IR signals – specifically a RAW NEC signal and a longer RAW Mitsubishi Air Conditioner signal using soft PWM. We have since improved the PWM method shown in Part 1 & Part 2 to provide better performance and improve portability. In this Part 3, we will take the signals from Part 2 and show how to send them using their binary (or Hex) representation, which can save lots of SRAM in many projects, particularly when dealing with longer AC signals.

Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino, Part 3 – [Link]

AT89C2051 Development Stick

AT89C2051_DEV_STICK_PIC

89C2051 Development Stick kit offers an easy way of interfacing 89C2051 compatible MCU’s.

  • Slim design with plug in type approach
  • Voltage regulator on board for stable and regulated supply to the MCU
  • RESET switch for resetting the MCU
  • 0592 MHz Crystal
  • 4K external EEPROM
  • Power-On LED for indicator
  • 20-Pin well marked Berg connector for ease of connection
  • Access to all IO pins & supply pin on the Berg connector
  • 20-Pin IC socket for MCU
  • Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
  • PCB dimensions 35 mm x 72 mm

AT89C2051 Development Stick – [Link]

UT602 – for those who are interested in miliOhms

obr1746_1

We have for you a measuring device able to measure even small resistance with 0.01 Ohm resolution.

UT602 is exactly that device, which you may have missed at development of devices operating with higher currents, where every resistance (lead, connector, joint,…) acts negatively, as well in applications using small resistors (shunts for current measuring and similar).

UT602 might be easily classified as a common multimeter if not having one useful measuring range marked as „20 Ohm“. The device is able to measure with 10 miliOhm in this range. Naturally, a measured value also depends on resistance of testing leads but in praxis it´s always possible to find out this added inaccuracy by their connection to each other before measurement.

Inductors also belong to components frequently used in devices using high currents (switch-mode power supplies, filters,….), that´s why a possibility to measure inductance (with 1uH resolution) is certainly valuable feature. Diode and transistor testing as well as continuity tester (buzzer) are “extra bonus”.

Detailed description will provide you the UT602 user guide. UT602 is our stable stock item.


UT602 – for those who are interested in miliOhms – [Link]