Tag Archives: ATtiny85

USB Power Meter

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Daniel Grießhaber @ hackaday.io has published his build of a USB power meter. His device is based on ATTiny 85 mcu and 0.96″ OLED Display and is able to measure voltage, current and power output from USB port.

Since USB has become more and more a power delivery standard, it would be nice to have a convenient way to measure the power consumption these devices need. Of course there are already power meters out there, but they are just boring or don’t have all the features I like.

USB Power Meter – [Link]

Programming an ATtiny with Arduino board

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This detailed tutorial shows how to program an ATtiny45, ATtiny85, ATtiny44 or ATtiny84 microcontroller using the Arduino software.

The ATtiny45 or 85 is a great option for running simple Arduino programs: it’s small, cheap and relatively easy to use. It does, however, have some limitations relative to the ATmega328P on an Arduino Uno. There are fewer pins, meaning you can’t connect as many components.

Programming an ATtiny with Arduino board – [Link]

ATtiny85 Game Console

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webboggles.com has designed a SSD1306 OLED Screen based game kit using an ATtiny85 microcontroller. They also sell it as a kit to assemble it yourself.

The new snap case has been updated to allow enough height for the screen header as well as a factory made CR2032 battery holder.
The buttons have been concealed to prevent spontaneous button presses inside bags and pockets.

ATtiny85 Game Console – [Link]

ATTiny85 board A First Look and review

educ8s.tv wanted to take a look at this tiny board for a long time. It is very small size, it is low cost and it uses a different processor than the Arduino boards. It uses the ATTiny 85 microcontroller chip, which can operate at a frequency up to 20Mhz. It has 8Kb of flash memory, 512bytes of RAM memory and 6 I/O pins 2 of which can implement the I2C protocol. It is very small in size and has low power requirements. We can program it using the Arduino IDE, which makes things so much easier! I got this tiny board with a USB interface in order to be easier to program. You can find a link for this ATtiny85 board in the description of the video.

educ8s.tv wanted to test if the ATtiny85 board is a good option for simple projects and if we achieve longer battery life with this board that a standard Arduino mini. Let’s find out together.

ATTiny85 board A First Look and review – [Link]

Polyphonic Synth Cable

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Polyphonic MIDI Synth on an ATtiny2313:

This is the fourth synthesizer cable I’ve built, the first three being based on the ATtiny85. I have been looking into ARM chips but haven’t gotten to grips with them just yet. Instead, I decided go back to the ATtiny2313, which has a quarter of the memories of the tiny85, but a hardware UART port and more pins.

Polyphonic Synth Cable – [Link]

DIL-Duino – Arduino in a DIL shape

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DIL-Duino is a complete Arduino environment in a DIL-8 form factor based on the DigiSpark Hardware. by Daniel Grießhaber:

DIL-Duino uses the QFN Version of the ATTiny85 and a USB Bootloader to provide the easy to use Arduino stack in a single DIL-8 Package Footprint.
To fit the Micro-USB socket on the board, it was necessary to make the actual board bigger than the DIL Package, but after development the Board is perforated to break the USB Socket and get the desired footprint.

DIL-Duino – Arduino in a DIL shape – [Link]

DIY Wearable Posture Sensor

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With the help of this wearable device you can improve your posture as it will remind you whenever you slouch. The device is based on ADXL335 accelerometer and Attiny85 microcontroller and a vibration motor will get you notified.

Posture sensors/monitors have been a recurring theme on this blog. They are supposed to remind you of your posture and prevent you from slouching, which can be a cause for back pain and headaches.While my previous sensors were either fixed to a chair or desk, this time I wanted to create a wearable version, that would allow for free movement. As always, one of the main goals was to make this project cheap and easy to reproduce.

DIY Wearable Posture Sensor – [Link]

ATtiny85 Ring Watch

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This is a great ATtiny85 watch that uses a SSD1306 OLED display and is powered by a CR1220 battery.

Today core subject, ATtiny85. Someone suggest me to use SOIC version to reduce the watch size and I found the coin cell mAh calculation method will count the battery voltage down to 2.0 V, so this watch require a low voltage version MCU to keep it stable. So I have ordered an ATTINY85V-10SU. (much expensive $_$)

ATtiny85 Ring Watch – [Link]

ATtiny OLED Watch Core

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陳亮 @ instructables.com shows us his ATtiny85 OLED display build on a breadboard:

This instructable show how to use an ATtiny85 to create a tiny watch core that can run over 1 year before recharge or replace battery.

The instruction to make the watch case may be in next instructable.

I have made a few Arduino watch before, but I found the watch using ATmega boards or ATmega chips are a little bit too big to wear. So I would like to make it with a smaller chips.

ATtiny OLED Watch Core – [Link]

ATiny does 170×240 VGA with 8 Colors

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AtomicZombie @ avrfreaks.net used an ATtiny85 ATMEL microcontroller to produce a 170×240 VGA signal and also send audio along with video.

The original plan was to just bit bang some mono VGA and do up a Pong or Tetris game, but things went MUCH MUCH further than I ever thought possible, so over the next few weeks I will detail this fun project here. I call it The QUARK-85 VGA DEMO System.

So what can one do with an ATTINY-85 and no other external components, an 8 pin package that leaves ONLY 4 IO lines after you feed it a clock??

How about 4 color rock solid VGA with stereo sound!!!

ATiny does 170×240 VGA with 8 Colors – [Link]