Tag Archives: Battery

One step closer to the ‘ultimate battery’


Erica Torres @ edn.com discuss about lithium-air batteries that looks promising for future use.

Although scientists are still working toward replacing lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries with lithium-air (Li-air), or lithium-oxygen, batteries, researchers at the University of Cambridge have developed a lab-based demonstrator of such a battery. It is safe to say we still have another decade before we can begin to utilize such powerful batteries as scientists work to make sure it is stable enough for widespread use.

One step closer to the ‘ultimate battery’ – [Link]

LiFePO4 charger


Markus Gritsch shared his LiFePO4 charger project in the forum:

Since I really like using LiFePO4 AA and AAA batteries in some of my projects, I finally gave in and built a dedicated charger for them.
Previously I used a lab power supply to mimic the constant current/constant voltage charging curve, which worked also fine. But after seeing Patrick Van Oosterwijck nifty LiFePO4wered/USB™, I thought it would be a bit more convenient to charge these batteries using USB.

LiFePO4 charger – [Link]

Not a battery, not a cap: Murata’s small energy [storage] device


by Graham Prophet @ edn-europe.com:

To meet what the company sees as a gap in the available range of energy storage solutions, Murata has developed the UMAC, a small, high-capacity cylinder-type energy device for use in wearable and wireless sensor applications. Although lithium-ion based, Murata differentiates it from a battery.

The UMAC is a miniature device with a high energy storage capacity, low internal resistance, fast charging and discharging and the ability to withstand load fluctuations. It may be used as a secondary battery in the same way as a capacitor. The UMAC achieves better charge/discharge characteristics and has an extended cycle life superior to conventional batteries. Suited for use as a power supply for wearable devices or sensor nodes for wireless sensor networks, the UMAC maintains flat voltage characteristics while accommodating a wide range of load characteristics.

Not a battery, not a cap: Murata’s small energy [storage] device – [Link]

Power Management Solutions: Battery Chargers


Maurizio @ dev.emcelettronica.com writes:

Out of all portable devices, the most numerous are the mobile phones (Figure 1). Most of them feature Li-ion or Li-polymer accumulators and Freescale has a broad range of charger ICs dedicated to supporting all the phases of a complete recharge cycle. Generally speaking the charging of a mobile phone is performed by taking energy from:

a) from a wall outlet
b) from the USB port of a computer
c) from the 12V output of a vehicle

Power Management Solutions: Battery Chargers – [Link]

Charger interface IC avoids handset overheating at fast-charge rates


by Graham Prophet @ edn-europe.com:

Power Integrations offers a charger interface IC compatible with Qualcomm’s Quick Charge 3.0 specification; PI says its CHY103D IC optimises efficiency to prevent handset overheating during high-speed charging.

Added to the ChiPhy charger-interface IC family, PI saya this is the first IC for off-line AC-DC chargers compatible with the Quick Charge (QC) 3.0 protocol from Qualcomm Technologies. Used alongside Power Integrations’ InnoSwitch AC-DC switcher ICs, the CHY103D device incorporates all of the functions needed to support QC 3.0. The QC 3.0 protocol implemented in the CHY103D device substantially reduces losses in the smart mobile device handset during rapid charging. This permits system designers to choose to charge handsets faster or reduce phone touch-temperature during charging, and enhances the efficiency of the charging process.

Charger interface IC avoids handset overheating at fast-charge rates – [Link]

IC monitors multicell battery packs

Intersil ISL94203

by Susan Nordyk @ edn.com:

The ISL94203 battery-pack monitor IC from Intersil monitors, protects, and cell-balances three- to eight-cell rechargeable battery packs, supporting Li-ion CoO2, Li-ion Mn2O4, and Li-ion FePO4 chemistries. Its internal state machine has five preprogrammed stages that accurately control each cell of a battery pack to extend operating life.

In addition to functioning as a stand-alone battery-management system for rechargeable Li-ion battery packs, the ISL94203 can be used with an external microcontroller communicating via an I2C interface. The device integrates high-side charge/discharge FET-drive circuitry, which allows the battery pack to be securely ground referenced.

IC monitors multicell battery packs – [Link]

Get a constant +5V output by switching between a +5V input and a single-cell LI+ rechargeable cell


App note from Maxim Integrated on providing smooth power from two sources. Link here (PDF)

Design provides a simple method for maintaining an uninterrupted +5V even while switching between the external +5V supply and a rechargeable single-cell Li+ battery.

Get a constant +5V output by switching between a +5V input and a single-cell LI+ rechargeable cell – [Link]

Supercap energy density rivals batteries


by Martin Cooke @ elektormagazine.com:

A novel design of supercapacitor using a hybrid silica sol-gel material and self-assembled monolayers of a common fatty acid has been developed by researchers working at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The device is said to provide an electrical energy storage capacity rivaling certain batteries, with both a high energy density and high power density.

The new material is composed of a silica sol-gel thin film containing polar groups linked to the silicon atoms and a nanoscale self-assembled monolayer of an octylphosphonic acid, which provides the insulating properties. The bilayer structure blocks the injection of electrons into the sol-gel material, providing low leakage current, high breakdown strength and high energy extraction efficiency.

Supercap energy density rivals batteries – [Link]

ESP8266 MQTT battery monitor project


Steve’s latest project, a wireless MQTT battery monitor:

This board uses an ESP8266 (ESP12), a Texas Instruments INA226 I2C voltage and current monitor, and a Texas Instruments LMR12010X buck converter. This board is designed to wirelessly monitor 12 volt batteries and power supplies using an external current shunt resistor. The voltage across the shunt resistor is measured differentially. The shunt resistor value and current rating is programmable in the firmware.

ESP8266 MQTT battery monitor project – [Link]