Inside Intel’s first product: the 3101 RAM chip held just 64 bits

Inside Intel’s first product: the 3101 RAM chip held just 64 bits

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Ken Shirriff takes a look inside the 3110 RAM chip from Intel. He writes:

Intel’s first product was not a processor, but a memory chip: the 31011 RAM chip, released in April 1969. This chip held just 64 bits of data (equivalent to 8 letters or 16 digits) and had the steep price tag of $99.50. The chip’s capacity was way too small to replace core memory, the dominant storage technology at the time, which stored bits in tiny magnetized ferrite cores. However, the 3101 performed at high speed due to its special Schottky transistors, making it useful in minicomputers where CPU registers required fast storage. The overthrow of core memory would require a different technology—MOS DRAM chips—and the 3101 remained in use in the 1980s.3

Inside Intel’s first product: the 3101 RAM chip held just 64 bits – [Link]

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