PD Micro – A Pro Micro with USB-C Power Delivery

PD Micro – A Pro Micro with USB-C Power Delivery

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PD Micro is the first Arduino-compatible board with USB-C power delivery. The pins are compatible with Pro micro. PD Micro allows you to control high voltage easily from USB-C Power delivery. It’s useful for applications that require voltage higher than 5V – like motor control or a high-power LED.

New USB-C Power Delivery Library

PD Micro is accompanied by our newly-implemented, simple, compact, USB-C power delivery library. This was written over the course of porting the code for PD Micro. We ended up writing a library completely from scratch. The result is a simple, compact, portable source code for USB-C device only application, which can be put inside ATmega328/ATmega32U4.

Specifications:

  • Microcontroller: ATmega32U4 running at 5V/16MHz
  • Voltage Regulator: TPS62175 DC-DC for efficient 5-20V to 5V
  • USB-C PHY: FUSB302 (USB PD communication on CC pins)
  • ESD protection on D+/D-/CC1/CC2 pins
  • Pinout: (pin compatible to Pro Micro)
    • 9x 10-bit ADC pins
    • 12x Digital I/Os (INT and I2C bus are shared with FUSB302)
    • 5x GND pins
    • 3x VBUS pins (USB-C power)
    • 1x 5V pin (DC-DC output)
  • Status LEDs:
    • TX / RX
    • 5 LED for Power Delivery voltage level
    • 3 LED for Power Delivery current level
  • Reset button
  • USB-C port for programming and power delivery
  • 3.5 mm 2 pos Terminal Jack for power output
  • Four layer PCB with ground plane and 3 mm wide VBUS trace
  • Size: 1.6 x 0.7 inches (extra 0.3 inches for power connector pins)

Features:

  • Set power delivery voltage output level by updating code through Arduino IDE
  • New USB Power delivery protocol library for UFP(device):
    • Written from draft, not base on any existing library
    • Simple, size optimized, more than half of RAM and Code space in ATmega32 are available to user
    • Highly portable code
    • Fully open source

The project will soon launch on www.crowdsupply.com, stay tuned.

Mike is the founder and editor of Electronics-Lab.com, an electronics engineering community/news and project sharing platform. He studied Electronics and Physics and enjoys everything that has moving electrons and fun. His interests lying on solar cells, microcontrollers and switchmode power supplies. Feel free to reach him for feedback, random tips or just to say hello :-)

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