Tag Archives: graphene

The future looks bright for graphene


by elektor.com:

The wonder material with so many extraordinary properties has found its way out of the research lab and into a commercial product. This new product will surely posses super powers and allow us to do things we thought impossible and probably change our lives for ever. Well, actually no. In this case Graphene has been used in the reinvention of what was arguably the first commercial electrical device patented back in 1879. It is perilously close to April 1st but the National Graphene Institute has announced they will be producing a light bulb based on graphene.

The light bulb has an LED shaped like a filament coated in graphene. It is thought the new lamp will use 10 % less energy compared to conventional light bulbs. Manufacturing costs are also lower and it will be made using more sustainable components. The company behind this new light bulb is Graphene Lighting. Professor Colin Bailey is a director of the company and also deputy vice-chancellor at Manchester University. According to Prof Bailey the light bulb should be available later this year and will be priced around $22.

The future looks bright for graphene – [Link]

Flexible graphene-based LED clears the way for flexible displays


by Colin Jeffrey @ gizmag.com:

Researchers from the University of Manchester and University of Sheffield have developed a new prototype semi-transparent, graphene-based LED device that could form the basis of flexible screens for use in the next-generation of mobile phones, tablets and televisions. The incredibly thin display was created using sandwiched “heterostructures”, is only 10-40 atoms thick and emits a sheet of light across its entire surface.

Flexible graphene-based LED clears the way for flexible displays – [Link]

First Graphene-based Flexible Display


by elektor.com:

The image may be a bit grainy and (at the moment) just monochrome but that is only to be expected for what is the world’s first flexible display to incorporate graphene in its pixel electronics. The new display technology is a result of collaboration between the Cambridge Graphene Centre and Plastic Logic. Plastic Logic has already developed flexible display electronics but this new prototype is an active matrix electrophoretic display, similar to the screens used in today’s e-readers, made of flexible plastic instead of glass. In contrast to conventional displays, the pixel electronics, or backplane, of this display includes a solution-processed graphene electrode, replacing the sputtered metal electrode layer within Plastic Logic’s conventional devices, bringing product and process benefits.

First Graphene-based Flexible Display – [Link]

UW Researchers Create World’s Thinnest LED At Only 3 Atoms Thick


The world’s thinnest LED at only 3 atoms thick:

Researchers at the University of Washington (UW) have demonstrated electroluminescence in a flexible, mechanically strong construct of the semiconductor tungsten selenide only three atoms thick.

The researchers harvested single sheets of tungsten selenide (WSe2) using adhesive tape, a technique invented for the production of graphene. They used a support and dielectric layer of boron nitride on a base of silicon dioxide on silicon, to come up with the thinnest possible LED.

The LEDs now used in most consumer electronics are rigid and are hundreds to thousands of times as thick as the material being developed at UW — which the team characterizes as 1/10,000th the thickness of a human hair.

Existing inorganic LEDs are not appropriate for use in bendable, foldable applications such as electronic devices and displays integrated into clothing. Organic light-emitting diodes are the usual candidates for such applications, but the techniques being pioneered at UW can produce devices that are not only much thinner — and stackable — but also far more versatile.

UW Researchers Create World’s Thinnest LED At Only 3 Atoms Thick – [Link]

IBM Chip uses Graphene FETs


In a paper published in Nature Communications researchers at IBM describe how they have built a silicon-based receiver chip incorporating GFETs or Graphene Field Effect Transistors (the purple structure in the photo) into the circuit. The multi-stage receiver integrated circuit consists of 3 graphene transistors, 4 inductors, 2 capacitors, and 2 resistors.

“This is the first time that someone has shown graphene devices and circuits to perform modern wireless communication functions comparable to silicon technology,

Graphene could be good for Quantum Computing


Researchers experimenting with the properties of Graphene have discovered that when the single-atom-thick sheet is exposed to extreme low temperatures and high magnetic field it has the ability to filter electrons according to their spin direction.

At room temperature and with no magnetic field the flake of graphene functions as a normal conductor with electrons flowing throughout the sheet. With the application of a magnetic field perpendicular to the sheet the electrons migrate out to the sheet edges while the rest of the sheet has the properties of an insulator. Current flow around the edges is either clockwise or anticlockwise depending on the orientation of the field (known as the quantum Hall effect).

When the MIT researchers switched a second magnetic field in the same plane as the Graphene sheet they found that electrons move around the edge in either clockwise or counterclockwise direction depending on the electron’s direction of spin. [via]

Graphene could be good for Quantum Computing – [Link]

Tiny FM Transmitter uses Voltage Controlled Graphene Resonator


A team of Columbia Engineering researchers, led by Mechanical Engineering Professor James Hone and Electrical Engineering Professor Kenneth Shepard, exploring the properties of graphene have demonstrated a new electro-mechanical resonant component.

The resonator’s structure consists of a 2-4 micrometer long strip of graphene suspended over a metal gate electrode. The strip of graphene has a natural resonance governed by its physical dimension and is used in the demonstration as the frequency determining element in an RF feedback oscillator circuit. Applying a voltage to the gate electrode stresses and deflects the graphene strip changing its resonant frequency. The team applied baseband audio and tones to the gate electrode to produce a 100 MHz FM signal.[via]

Tiny FM Transmitter uses Voltage Controlled Graphene Resonator – [Link]

3D Graphene for Cheaper Solar Cells

3D honeycomb-structure of 3D graphene increases its conductivity to rival precious metals.
3D honeycomb-structure of 3D graphene increases its conductivity to rival precious metals.

Graphene is by definition flat and planar, but researchers at Michigan Tech have discovered a manner of fabricating 3-D graphene–a honeycomb structure that can replace the expensive precious metals in solar cells and potentially other energy applications such as batteries and even superconductors. [via]

3D Graphene for Cheaper Solar Cells – [Link]